Does muscle tension reflect arousal? Relationship between electromyographic and electroencephalographic recordings

Rudolf Hoehn-Saric, Richard L. Hazlett, Tahere Pourmotabbed, Daniel R. McLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increased muscle tension and heightened arousal are the most consistent finding in patients with anxiety disorders. This study examined the relationship between frontalis and gastrocnemius electromyographic (EMG) and electroencephalographic activity on 14 female generalized anxiety disorder patients and 14 female control subjects. In GAD patients, gastrocnemius but not frontalis EMG was correlated with right but not left hemisphere activity. For the non-anxious subjects, there was a pattern for both β1 and β2 waves to be positively associated with both frontalis and gastrocnemius muscle tension levels. The results, while preliminary, suggest that EMG activity may reflect central nervous system arousal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-55
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 1997

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Muscle Tonus
Arousal
Anxiety Disorders
Skeletal Muscle
Central Nervous System

Keywords

  • Arousal
  • EEG
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Muscle
  • Psychophysiology
  • Tension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Does muscle tension reflect arousal? Relationship between electromyographic and electroencephalographic recordings. / Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Hazlett, Richard L.; Pourmotabbed, Tahere; McLeod, Daniel R.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 71, No. 1, 16.05.1997, p. 49-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf ; Hazlett, Richard L. ; Pourmotabbed, Tahere ; McLeod, Daniel R. / Does muscle tension reflect arousal? Relationship between electromyographic and electroencephalographic recordings. In: Psychiatry Research. 1997 ; Vol. 71, No. 1. pp. 49-55.
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