Does Lorr's interpersonal style inventory measure the five-factor model?

Robert R. McCrae, Paul Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The second-order factors of Lorr's Interpersonal Style Inventory (ISI) have been interpreted as measures of the five-factor model. To assess that hypothesis, 126 adult men and women completed the ISI and two measures of the model: the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and a set of adjective scales. Correlations showed significant agreement at the level of broad factors, and a joint factor analysis with individual ISI scales recovered the hypothesized five factors. However, several ISI scales loaded on different factors than would have been predicted from their classification in the ISI. Results confirm the generality of the five-factor model but underscore the need for detailed empirical analyses to confirm or qualify interpretations of scales in terms of the five-factor model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-197
Number of pages3
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Does Lorr's interpersonal style inventory measure the five-factor model? / McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1994, p. 195-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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