Does Intimate Partner Violence Epidemiology Differ between Homes with and Without Children? A Population-Based Study of Annual Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

Megan H. Bair-Merritt, William C. Holmes, John H. Holmes, Jamie Feinstein, Chris Feudtner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We sought to determine whether intimate partner violence (IPV) risk factors differed depending upon the presence of children in the home, and to estimate the annual prevalence of IPV first in the general population and then in homes with and without children. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional random sample of 6,836 women in southeastern Pennsylvania interviewed by telephone in 2004. The magnitude of association between IPV and risk factors varied between homes with and without children for women's alcohol problems (with children, odds ratio (OR) 7.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9, 20.9; without children, OR 2.4; 95% CI 0.9, 6.0), and mental health problems (with children, OR 4.0; 95% CI 1.8, 8.9; without children, OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.6, 5.7). Poverty was significantly associated with IPV only in homes without children (OR 3.6; 95% CI 1.9, 7.2). Annual IPV prevalence was 1.2% overall, 1.4% in homes with children, and 1.1% in homes without children. One in 63 children lived in a home with IPV. Differences in IPV risk factors in homes with and without children suggest distinct underlying IPV mechanisms or consequences in these contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-332
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Keywords

  • Children
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Prevalence
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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