Does Increased Consolidated Nighttime Sleep Facilitate Attentional Control? A Pilot Study of Nap Restriction in Preschoolers

Janet C. Lam, Taylor A. Koriakin, Steven M. Scharf, Thornton B.A. Mason, Ernest M Mahone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to understand the impact of a 5-day period of nap restriction on sleep patterns and cognitive function in typically developing preschoolers, aged 3 to 4 years. Method: Following 1 week of baseline assessment, 28 children were randomly assigned to either a “napping as usual” group (n = 15) or a 5-day period of nap restriction (n = 13). Sleep was assessed with sleep logs and actigraphy; cognition was assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention week. Results: No group differences in sleep or cognitive function were observed at baseline. For the no-nap group, the 5-day period of daytime nap restriction resulted in increased nighttime sleep. Children in the no-nap group also showed a significant improvement in attentional control compared with baseline, whereas no such changes were observed among children in the napping-as-usual group. Conclusion: In preschool children who typically take naps, short-term nap restriction is associated with increased nighttime sleep and may contribute to improved attentional function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-340
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Sleep
Cognition
Actigraphy
Preschool Children

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • nap restriction
  • napping
  • preschoolers
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Does Increased Consolidated Nighttime Sleep Facilitate Attentional Control? A Pilot Study of Nap Restriction in Preschoolers. / Lam, Janet C.; Koriakin, Taylor A.; Scharf, Steven M.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Mahone, Ernest M.

In: Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.02.2019, p. 333-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lam, Janet C. ; Koriakin, Taylor A. ; Scharf, Steven M. ; Mason, Thornton B.A. ; Mahone, Ernest M. / Does Increased Consolidated Nighttime Sleep Facilitate Attentional Control? A Pilot Study of Nap Restriction in Preschoolers. In: Journal of Attention Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 333-340.
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