Does health literacy level influence the effectiveness of a kiosk-based intervention delivered in the pediatric emergency department?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. This study assesses parents' literacy skills and evaluates how literacy levels influenced the effectiveness of a health communication intervention designed to improve safety knowledge in low-income, urban families. Methods. A total of n = 450 parents of children aged 4 to 66 months completed the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and participated in a randomized trial of an injury prevention intervention delivered via computer kiosk in a pediatric emergency department. A safety knowledge test was administered by telephone 2 to 4 weeks later. Results. More than one-third of parents were assessed by the REALM to have marginal (30%) or inadequate (8%) reading levels; the remaining 62% of parents had adequate reading levels. REALM scores were independently associated with knowledge gains for poison storage and smoke alarms. Conclusions. Participants reading level had an independent and significant effect on safety knowledge outcomes. Literacy level should be considered in all patient education efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-55
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Hospital Emergency Service
Pediatrics
Parents
Reading
Medicine
Safety
Health Communication
Poisons
Patient Education
Telephone
Smoke
Literacy
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • evaluation
  • health literacy
  • injury prevention
  • pediatrics
  • REALM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{2cd88fff41834841a745e0e2c87a5276,
title = "Does health literacy level influence the effectiveness of a kiosk-based intervention delivered in the pediatric emergency department?",
abstract = "Objective. This study assesses parents' literacy skills and evaluates how literacy levels influenced the effectiveness of a health communication intervention designed to improve safety knowledge in low-income, urban families. Methods. A total of n = 450 parents of children aged 4 to 66 months completed the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and participated in a randomized trial of an injury prevention intervention delivered via computer kiosk in a pediatric emergency department. A safety knowledge test was administered by telephone 2 to 4 weeks later. Results. More than one-third of parents were assessed by the REALM to have marginal (30{\%}) or inadequate (8{\%}) reading levels; the remaining 62{\%} of parents had adequate reading levels. REALM scores were independently associated with knowledge gains for poison storage and smoke alarms. Conclusions. Participants reading level had an independent and significant effect on safety knowledge outcomes. Literacy level should be considered in all patient education efforts.",
keywords = "evaluation, health literacy, injury prevention, pediatrics, REALM",
author = "Shields, {Wendy C} and McDonald, {Eileen M} and McKenzie, {Lara B.} and Andrea Gielen",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0009922815602889",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "48--55",
journal = "Clinical Pediatrics",
issn = "0009-9228",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does health literacy level influence the effectiveness of a kiosk-based intervention delivered in the pediatric emergency department?

AU - Shields, Wendy C

AU - McDonald, Eileen M

AU - McKenzie, Lara B.

AU - Gielen, Andrea

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective. This study assesses parents' literacy skills and evaluates how literacy levels influenced the effectiveness of a health communication intervention designed to improve safety knowledge in low-income, urban families. Methods. A total of n = 450 parents of children aged 4 to 66 months completed the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and participated in a randomized trial of an injury prevention intervention delivered via computer kiosk in a pediatric emergency department. A safety knowledge test was administered by telephone 2 to 4 weeks later. Results. More than one-third of parents were assessed by the REALM to have marginal (30%) or inadequate (8%) reading levels; the remaining 62% of parents had adequate reading levels. REALM scores were independently associated with knowledge gains for poison storage and smoke alarms. Conclusions. Participants reading level had an independent and significant effect on safety knowledge outcomes. Literacy level should be considered in all patient education efforts.

AB - Objective. This study assesses parents' literacy skills and evaluates how literacy levels influenced the effectiveness of a health communication intervention designed to improve safety knowledge in low-income, urban families. Methods. A total of n = 450 parents of children aged 4 to 66 months completed the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and participated in a randomized trial of an injury prevention intervention delivered via computer kiosk in a pediatric emergency department. A safety knowledge test was administered by telephone 2 to 4 weeks later. Results. More than one-third of parents were assessed by the REALM to have marginal (30%) or inadequate (8%) reading levels; the remaining 62% of parents had adequate reading levels. REALM scores were independently associated with knowledge gains for poison storage and smoke alarms. Conclusions. Participants reading level had an independent and significant effect on safety knowledge outcomes. Literacy level should be considered in all patient education efforts.

KW - evaluation

KW - health literacy

KW - injury prevention

KW - pediatrics

KW - REALM

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949523012&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949523012&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0009922815602889

DO - 10.1177/0009922815602889

M3 - Article

C2 - 26333526

AN - SCOPUS:84949523012

VL - 55

SP - 48

EP - 55

JO - Clinical Pediatrics

JF - Clinical Pediatrics

SN - 0009-9228

IS - 1

ER -