Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction

C. C. Meltzer, M. N. Cantwell, P. J. Greer, D. Ben-Eliezer, Gwenn Smith, G. Frank, W. H. Kaye, P. R. Houck, J. C. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It remains a matter of controversy as to whether cerebral perfusion declines with healthy aging. In vivo imaging with PET permits quantitative evaluation of brain physiology; however, previous PET studies have inconsistently reported aging reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In part, this may be because of a lack of correction for the dilution effect of age-related cerebral volume loss on PET measurements. Methods: CBF PET scans were obtained using [15O]H2O in 27 healthy individuals (age range, 19-76 y) and corrected for partial-volume effects from cerebral atrophy using an MR-based algorithm. Results: There was a significant difference (P = 0.01) in mean cortical CBF between young/midlife (age range, 19-46 y; mean ± SD, 56 ± 10 mL/100 mL/min) and elderly (age range, 60-76 y; mean ± SD, 49 ± 2.6 mL/100 mL/min) subgroups before correcting for partial-volume effects. However, this group difference resolved after partial-volume correction (young/midlife: mean ± SD, 62 ± 10 mL/100 mL/min; elderly: mean ± SD, 61 ± 4.8 mL/100 mL/min; P = 0.66). When all subjects were considered, a mild but significant inverse correlation between age and cortical CBF measurements was present in the uncorrected but not the corrected data. Conclusion: This study suggests that CBF may not decline with age in healthy individuals and that failure to correct for the dilution effect of age-related cerebral atrophy may confound interpretation of previous PET studies that have shown aging reductions in physiologic measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1842-1848
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume41
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Atrophy
Positron-Emission Tomography
Perfusion
Oxygen
Glucose
Brain

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Brain
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Emission tomography
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Meltzer, C. C., Cantwell, M. N., Greer, P. J., Ben-Eliezer, D., Smith, G., Frank, G., ... Price, J. C. (2000). Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 41(11), 1842-1848.

Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction. / Meltzer, C. C.; Cantwell, M. N.; Greer, P. J.; Ben-Eliezer, D.; Smith, Gwenn; Frank, G.; Kaye, W. H.; Houck, P. R.; Price, J. C.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 11, 2000, p. 1842-1848.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meltzer, CC, Cantwell, MN, Greer, PJ, Ben-Eliezer, D, Smith, G, Frank, G, Kaye, WH, Houck, PR & Price, JC 2000, 'Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction', Journal of Nuclear Medicine, vol. 41, no. 11, pp. 1842-1848.
Meltzer CC, Cantwell MN, Greer PJ, Ben-Eliezer D, Smith G, Frank G et al. Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction. Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2000;41(11):1842-1848.
Meltzer, C. C. ; Cantwell, M. N. ; Greer, P. J. ; Ben-Eliezer, D. ; Smith, Gwenn ; Frank, G. ; Kaye, W. H. ; Houck, P. R. ; Price, J. C. / Does cerebral blood flow decline in healthy aging? A PET study with partial-volume correction. In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 41, No. 11. pp. 1842-1848.
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