Does breast-feeding reduce offspring junk food consumption during childhood? Examinations by socio-economic status and race/ethnicity

Dylan B. Jackson, Kecia R. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To examine whether breast-feeding duration and socio-economic status (SES) interact to predict junk food consumption among offspring and whether the interaction differs across racial/ethnic groups. Design Survey research using a longitudinal panel design. Hierarchical linear regression was used to analyse the data. Setting In-home interviews with the child's parents over a 5-year period across the USA. Subjects Approximately 10 000 American children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). Results The findings revealed that longer breast-feeding durations correspond to lower levels of junk food consumption, but that this relationship emerges consistently only among low-SES blacks. Conclusions Efforts to promote breast-feeding among low-SES black women may have the added benefit of reducing their children's junk food intake, and may thereby promote their general health and well-being. Future research should seek to explore the mechanisms by which breast-feeding might benefit the dietary habits of low-SES black children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1441-1451
Number of pages11
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast-feeding
  • Diet
  • Junk food
  • Moderating effect
  • Race
  • Socio-economic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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