Does biological relatedness affect survival?

David M Bishai, El Daw Suliman, Heena Brahmbhatt, Fred Wabwire-Mangen, Godfrey Kigozi, Nelson Sewankambo, David Serwadda, Maria J Wawer, Ronald H Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We studied child survival in Rakai, Uganda where many children are fostered out or orphaned. Methods: Biological relatedness is measured as the average of the Wright's coefficients between each household member and the child. Instrumental variables for fostering include proportion of adult males in household, age and gender of household head. Control variables include socioeconomic status (SES), religion, polygyny, household size, child age, child birth size, and child HIV status. Results: Presence of both parents in the household increased the odds of survival by 28%. After controlling for the endogeneity of child placement decisions in a multivariate model we found that lower biological relatedness of a child was associated with statistically significant reductions in child survival. The effects of biological relatedness on child survival tend to be stronger for both HIV- and HIV+ children of HIV+ mothers. Conclusions: Reductions in the numbers of close relatives caring for children of HIV+ mothers reduce child survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-278
Number of pages18
JournalDemographic Research
Volume8
StatePublished - May 7 2003

Fingerprint

household size
Uganda
social status
parents
Religion
gender

Keywords

  • AIDS/HIV
  • Child survival
  • Orphans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography

Cite this

Bishai, D. M., Suliman, E. D., Brahmbhatt, H., Wabwire-Mangen, F., Kigozi, G., Sewankambo, N., ... Gray, R. H. (2003). Does biological relatedness affect survival? Demographic Research, 8, 261-278.

Does biological relatedness affect survival? / Bishai, David M; Suliman, El Daw; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kigozi, Godfrey; Sewankambo, Nelson; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald H.

In: Demographic Research, Vol. 8, 07.05.2003, p. 261-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bishai, DM, Suliman, ED, Brahmbhatt, H, Wabwire-Mangen, F, Kigozi, G, Sewankambo, N, Serwadda, D, Wawer, MJ & Gray, RH 2003, 'Does biological relatedness affect survival?', Demographic Research, vol. 8, pp. 261-278.
Bishai DM, Suliman ED, Brahmbhatt H, Wabwire-Mangen F, Kigozi G, Sewankambo N et al. Does biological relatedness affect survival? Demographic Research. 2003 May 7;8:261-278.
Bishai, David M ; Suliman, El Daw ; Brahmbhatt, Heena ; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred ; Kigozi, Godfrey ; Sewankambo, Nelson ; Serwadda, David ; Wawer, Maria J ; Gray, Ronald H. / Does biological relatedness affect survival?. In: Demographic Research. 2003 ; Vol. 8. pp. 261-278.
@article{534d09c2ca364132bcdf58c4f8f6f648,
title = "Does biological relatedness affect survival?",
abstract = "Objective: We studied child survival in Rakai, Uganda where many children are fostered out or orphaned. Methods: Biological relatedness is measured as the average of the Wright's coefficients between each household member and the child. Instrumental variables for fostering include proportion of adult males in household, age and gender of household head. Control variables include socioeconomic status (SES), religion, polygyny, household size, child age, child birth size, and child HIV status. Results: Presence of both parents in the household increased the odds of survival by 28{\%}. After controlling for the endogeneity of child placement decisions in a multivariate model we found that lower biological relatedness of a child was associated with statistically significant reductions in child survival. The effects of biological relatedness on child survival tend to be stronger for both HIV- and HIV+ children of HIV+ mothers. Conclusions: Reductions in the numbers of close relatives caring for children of HIV+ mothers reduce child survival.",
keywords = "AIDS/HIV, Child survival, Orphans",
author = "Bishai, {David M} and Suliman, {El Daw} and Heena Brahmbhatt and Fred Wabwire-Mangen and Godfrey Kigozi and Nelson Sewankambo and David Serwadda and Wawer, {Maria J} and Gray, {Ronald H}",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
day = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "261--278",
journal = "Demographic Research",
issn = "1435-9871",
publisher = "Max-Planck Institute for Demographic Research/Max-Planck-institut fur Demografische Forschung",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does biological relatedness affect survival?

AU - Bishai, David M

AU - Suliman, El Daw

AU - Brahmbhatt, Heena

AU - Wabwire-Mangen, Fred

AU - Kigozi, Godfrey

AU - Sewankambo, Nelson

AU - Serwadda, David

AU - Wawer, Maria J

AU - Gray, Ronald H

PY - 2003/5/7

Y1 - 2003/5/7

N2 - Objective: We studied child survival in Rakai, Uganda where many children are fostered out or orphaned. Methods: Biological relatedness is measured as the average of the Wright's coefficients between each household member and the child. Instrumental variables for fostering include proportion of adult males in household, age and gender of household head. Control variables include socioeconomic status (SES), religion, polygyny, household size, child age, child birth size, and child HIV status. Results: Presence of both parents in the household increased the odds of survival by 28%. After controlling for the endogeneity of child placement decisions in a multivariate model we found that lower biological relatedness of a child was associated with statistically significant reductions in child survival. The effects of biological relatedness on child survival tend to be stronger for both HIV- and HIV+ children of HIV+ mothers. Conclusions: Reductions in the numbers of close relatives caring for children of HIV+ mothers reduce child survival.

AB - Objective: We studied child survival in Rakai, Uganda where many children are fostered out or orphaned. Methods: Biological relatedness is measured as the average of the Wright's coefficients between each household member and the child. Instrumental variables for fostering include proportion of adult males in household, age and gender of household head. Control variables include socioeconomic status (SES), religion, polygyny, household size, child age, child birth size, and child HIV status. Results: Presence of both parents in the household increased the odds of survival by 28%. After controlling for the endogeneity of child placement decisions in a multivariate model we found that lower biological relatedness of a child was associated with statistically significant reductions in child survival. The effects of biological relatedness on child survival tend to be stronger for both HIV- and HIV+ children of HIV+ mothers. Conclusions: Reductions in the numbers of close relatives caring for children of HIV+ mothers reduce child survival.

KW - AIDS/HIV

KW - Child survival

KW - Orphans

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2942735083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2942735083&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:2942735083

VL - 8

SP - 261

EP - 278

JO - Demographic Research

JF - Demographic Research

SN - 1435-9871

ER -