Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis

Hillary R. Bogner, Jin Hui Joo, Seungyoung Hwang, Knashawn H. Morales, Martha L. Bruce, Charles F. Reynolds, Joseph J Gallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives To determine whether treating depression decreases mortality from various chronic medical conditions. Design Long-term follow-up of multisite-practice randomized controlled trial (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial). Setting Twenty primary care practices randomized to intervention or usual care. Participants Individuals aged 60 and older identified through depression screening of random patients (N = 1,226). Intervention For 2 years, a depression care manager worked with primary care physicians in intervention practices to provide algorithm-based care for depression. Measurements Mortality risk based on a median follow-up of 98 months (range 0.8-116.4 months) through 2008; chronic medical conditions ascertained through self-report. Results For heart disease, persons with major depression were at greater risk of death, whether in usual-care or intervention practices. Older adults with major depression and diabetes mellitus in practices randomized to the intervention condition (hazard ratio = 0.47, 95% confidence interval = 0.24-0.91) were less likely to die. For other medical conditions, the point estimates for risk of death in persons with major depression were all in the direction of indicating lower risk in intervention practices but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Older adults with depression and medical comorbidity pose a significant clinical and public health challenge. Evidence was found of a statistically significant intervention effect on mortality for diabetes mellitus in persons with major depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-131
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Primary Health Care
Depression
Mortality
Diabetes Mellitus
Primary Care Physicians
Self Report
Suicide
Comorbidity
Heart Diseases
Randomized Controlled Trials
Public Health
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • depression
  • medical comorbidity
  • primary care
  • randomized clinical trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis. / Bogner, Hillary R.; Joo, Jin Hui; Hwang, Seungyoung; Morales, Knashawn H.; Bruce, Martha L.; Reynolds, Charles F.; Gallo, Joseph J.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 126-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bogner, Hillary R. ; Joo, Jin Hui ; Hwang, Seungyoung ; Morales, Knashawn H. ; Bruce, Martha L. ; Reynolds, Charles F. ; Gallo, Joseph J. / Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2016 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 126-131.
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