Do Thai physicians recommend seasonal influenza vaccines to pregnant women? A cross-sectional survey of physicians'perspectives and practices in Thailand

Prabda Praphasiri, Darunee Ditsungneon, Adena Greenbaum, Fatimah S. Dawood, Pornsak Yoocharoen, Deborah M. Stone, Sonja J. Olsen, Kim A. Lindblade, Charung Muangchana

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background Physicians play a major role in influencing acceptance and uptake of vaccines. However, little is known about physicians' perspectives on influenza vaccination of pregnant women in Thailand, for whom vaccine coverage is estimated at <1%. Method In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire on physicians' perceptions, attitudes and practices related to influenza vaccination for pregnant women was distributed to 1,134 hospitals with an antenatal care clinic (ANC) in Thailand. At each hospital, one physician working at the ANC completed the survey. Predictors of routine recommendation of influenza vaccine were analyzed utilizing log-binomial regression. Results A total of 580 (51%) complete responses were received from physicians practicing at ANCs. A favorable attitude towards vaccination was expressed by 436 (75%) physicians, however only 142 (25%) reported routinely recommending influenza vaccine to pregnant women in their current practice. Physicians were more likely to recommend influenza vaccine routinely when they had more than three years of practice (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-2.3), had treated pregnant women for influenza (PR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.7), perceived the influenza vaccine to be effective (moderate level: PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4; high level: PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9) and were aware of the Ministry of Public Health's (MOPH) recommendation of influenza vaccination in pregnancy (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). Vaccine not being available, perception that policy was ambiguous and lack of awareness of MOPH recommendations were the most commonly cited barriers to routine recommendation of influenza vaccine. Conclusion Despite a national policy to vaccinate pregnant women for influenza, only 25% of Thai physicians working in ANCs routinely recommend vaccination. Strategies are needed to increase vaccine availability and free vaccine services, address clinician concerns over vaccine effectiveness and expand healthcare provider awareness of MOPH recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0169221
JournalPloS one
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Influenza Vaccines
pregnant women
Thailand
physicians
cross-sectional studies
influenza
Pregnant Women
Vaccines
Cross-Sectional Studies
vaccines
Physicians
Human Influenza
Public health
Vaccination
vaccination
Prenatal Care
Public Health
prenatal care
public health
Availability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Do Thai physicians recommend seasonal influenza vaccines to pregnant women? A cross-sectional survey of physicians'perspectives and practices in Thailand. / Praphasiri, Prabda; Ditsungneon, Darunee; Greenbaum, Adena; Dawood, Fatimah S.; Yoocharoen, Pornsak; Stone, Deborah M.; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Muangchana, Charung.

In: PloS one, Vol. 12, No. 1, e0169221, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Praphasiri, P, Ditsungneon, D, Greenbaum, A, Dawood, FS, Yoocharoen, P, Stone, DM, Olsen, SJ, Lindblade, KA & Muangchana, C 2017, 'Do Thai physicians recommend seasonal influenza vaccines to pregnant women? A cross-sectional survey of physicians'perspectives and practices in Thailand', PloS one, vol. 12, no. 1, e0169221. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0169221
Praphasiri, Prabda ; Ditsungneon, Darunee ; Greenbaum, Adena ; Dawood, Fatimah S. ; Yoocharoen, Pornsak ; Stone, Deborah M. ; Olsen, Sonja J. ; Lindblade, Kim A. ; Muangchana, Charung. / Do Thai physicians recommend seasonal influenza vaccines to pregnant women? A cross-sectional survey of physicians'perspectives and practices in Thailand. In: PloS one. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background Physicians play a major role in influencing acceptance and uptake of vaccines. However, little is known about physicians' perspectives on influenza vaccination of pregnant women in Thailand, for whom vaccine coverage is estimated at <1{\%}. Method In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire on physicians' perceptions, attitudes and practices related to influenza vaccination for pregnant women was distributed to 1,134 hospitals with an antenatal care clinic (ANC) in Thailand. At each hospital, one physician working at the ANC completed the survey. Predictors of routine recommendation of influenza vaccine were analyzed utilizing log-binomial regression. Results A total of 580 (51{\%}) complete responses were received from physicians practicing at ANCs. A favorable attitude towards vaccination was expressed by 436 (75{\%}) physicians, however only 142 (25{\%}) reported routinely recommending influenza vaccine to pregnant women in their current practice. Physicians were more likely to recommend influenza vaccine routinely when they had more than three years of practice (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.9, 95{\%} CI 1.2-2.3), had treated pregnant women for influenza (PR 1.8, 95{\%} CI 1.3-2.7), perceived the influenza vaccine to be effective (moderate level: PR 1.6, 95{\%} CI 1.1-2.4; high level: PR 1.9, 95{\%} CI 1.3-2.9) and were aware of the Ministry of Public Health's (MOPH) recommendation of influenza vaccination in pregnancy (PR 1.3, 95{\%} CI 1.1-1.7). Vaccine not being available, perception that policy was ambiguous and lack of awareness of MOPH recommendations were the most commonly cited barriers to routine recommendation of influenza vaccine. Conclusion Despite a national policy to vaccinate pregnant women for influenza, only 25{\%} of Thai physicians working in ANCs routinely recommend vaccination. Strategies are needed to increase vaccine availability and free vaccine services, address clinician concerns over vaccine effectiveness and expand healthcare provider awareness of MOPH recommendations.",
author = "Prabda Praphasiri and Darunee Ditsungneon and Adena Greenbaum and Dawood, {Fatimah S.} and Pornsak Yoocharoen and Stone, {Deborah M.} and Olsen, {Sonja J.} and Lindblade, {Kim A.} and Charung Muangchana",
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T1 - Do Thai physicians recommend seasonal influenza vaccines to pregnant women? A cross-sectional survey of physicians'perspectives and practices in Thailand

AU - Praphasiri, Prabda

AU - Ditsungneon, Darunee

AU - Greenbaum, Adena

AU - Dawood, Fatimah S.

AU - Yoocharoen, Pornsak

AU - Stone, Deborah M.

AU - Olsen, Sonja J.

AU - Lindblade, Kim A.

AU - Muangchana, Charung

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Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background Physicians play a major role in influencing acceptance and uptake of vaccines. However, little is known about physicians' perspectives on influenza vaccination of pregnant women in Thailand, for whom vaccine coverage is estimated at <1%. Method In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire on physicians' perceptions, attitudes and practices related to influenza vaccination for pregnant women was distributed to 1,134 hospitals with an antenatal care clinic (ANC) in Thailand. At each hospital, one physician working at the ANC completed the survey. Predictors of routine recommendation of influenza vaccine were analyzed utilizing log-binomial regression. Results A total of 580 (51%) complete responses were received from physicians practicing at ANCs. A favorable attitude towards vaccination was expressed by 436 (75%) physicians, however only 142 (25%) reported routinely recommending influenza vaccine to pregnant women in their current practice. Physicians were more likely to recommend influenza vaccine routinely when they had more than three years of practice (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-2.3), had treated pregnant women for influenza (PR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.7), perceived the influenza vaccine to be effective (moderate level: PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4; high level: PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9) and were aware of the Ministry of Public Health's (MOPH) recommendation of influenza vaccination in pregnancy (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). Vaccine not being available, perception that policy was ambiguous and lack of awareness of MOPH recommendations were the most commonly cited barriers to routine recommendation of influenza vaccine. Conclusion Despite a national policy to vaccinate pregnant women for influenza, only 25% of Thai physicians working in ANCs routinely recommend vaccination. Strategies are needed to increase vaccine availability and free vaccine services, address clinician concerns over vaccine effectiveness and expand healthcare provider awareness of MOPH recommendations.

AB - Background Physicians play a major role in influencing acceptance and uptake of vaccines. However, little is known about physicians' perspectives on influenza vaccination of pregnant women in Thailand, for whom vaccine coverage is estimated at <1%. Method In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire on physicians' perceptions, attitudes and practices related to influenza vaccination for pregnant women was distributed to 1,134 hospitals with an antenatal care clinic (ANC) in Thailand. At each hospital, one physician working at the ANC completed the survey. Predictors of routine recommendation of influenza vaccine were analyzed utilizing log-binomial regression. Results A total of 580 (51%) complete responses were received from physicians practicing at ANCs. A favorable attitude towards vaccination was expressed by 436 (75%) physicians, however only 142 (25%) reported routinely recommending influenza vaccine to pregnant women in their current practice. Physicians were more likely to recommend influenza vaccine routinely when they had more than three years of practice (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-2.3), had treated pregnant women for influenza (PR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.7), perceived the influenza vaccine to be effective (moderate level: PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4; high level: PR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3-2.9) and were aware of the Ministry of Public Health's (MOPH) recommendation of influenza vaccination in pregnancy (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). Vaccine not being available, perception that policy was ambiguous and lack of awareness of MOPH recommendations were the most commonly cited barriers to routine recommendation of influenza vaccine. Conclusion Despite a national policy to vaccinate pregnant women for influenza, only 25% of Thai physicians working in ANCs routinely recommend vaccination. Strategies are needed to increase vaccine availability and free vaccine services, address clinician concerns over vaccine effectiveness and expand healthcare provider awareness of MOPH recommendations.

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