Do serum markers of liver fibrosis vary by HCV infection in patients with alcohol use disorder?

Arantza Sanvisens, Alvaro Munoz, Ferran Bolao, Paola Zuluaga, Magí Farré, Inmaculada Jarrin, Jordi Tor, Roberto Muga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: HCV infection is frequent in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Ethanol and hepatitis C have a synergistic effect that increases the risk of end-stage liver disease. We aimed to assess fibrosis of the liver in patients admitted to treatment of AUD. Methods: Data were collected in two hospital units between 2000 and 2014. Liver fibrosis was assessed by serum biomarkers APRI, FIB-4 and Forns, and Advanced Liver Fibrosis (ALF) was defined if APRI > 1.5, FIB-4 > 3.25 or Forns > 6.9. Correlations were analyzed by Pearson's coefficients and logistic regression models were used. Results: 1313 patients (80% M) had complete data; age at admission was 45 years (IQR: 39–52 yrs), age of initial regular alcohol consumption was 20 years (IQR: 17–26 yrs) and the amount of alcohol consumed preceding admission was 200 g/day (IQR: 120–270 g/day). Prevalence of HCV infection was 18%. Prevalence of ALF in HCV positive patients was 40.6% by APRI, 30.6% by FIB-4, and 43.3% by Forns. Correlations were high for APRI vs. FIB-4 r = 0.906, APRI vs. Forns r = 0.710, and, FIB-4 vs. Forns r = 0.825. There was no significant difference in the APRI/FIB-4 correlation by HCV status (z = 1.35, p = 0.177). However, the APRI/Forns correlation was significantly higher in HCV positive patients (p < 0.001). Patients with HCV infection were two times more likely to present with ALF at admission (OR = 2.1, 95%CI:1.5–3.1). Conclusions: HCV infection is associated with severity of fibrosis in patients with excessive alcohol consumption. In this context, APRI and FIB-4 are highly correlated which facilitates the assessment of liver damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume188
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Liver Cirrhosis
Liver
Biomarkers
Alcohols
Infection
Alcohol Drinking
Logistic Models
End Stage Liver Disease
Hospital Units
Hepatitis C
Logistics
Fibrosis
Ethanol
Serum

Keywords

  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Liver fibrosis
  • Markers of fibrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Do serum markers of liver fibrosis vary by HCV infection in patients with alcohol use disorder? / Sanvisens, Arantza; Munoz, Alvaro; Bolao, Ferran; Zuluaga, Paola; Farré, Magí; Jarrin, Inmaculada; Tor, Jordi; Muga, Roberto.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 188, 01.07.2018, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanvisens, Arantza ; Munoz, Alvaro ; Bolao, Ferran ; Zuluaga, Paola ; Farré, Magí ; Jarrin, Inmaculada ; Tor, Jordi ; Muga, Roberto. / Do serum markers of liver fibrosis vary by HCV infection in patients with alcohol use disorder?. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2018 ; Vol. 188. pp. 180-186.
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abstract = "Introduction: HCV infection is frequent in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Ethanol and hepatitis C have a synergistic effect that increases the risk of end-stage liver disease. We aimed to assess fibrosis of the liver in patients admitted to treatment of AUD. Methods: Data were collected in two hospital units between 2000 and 2014. Liver fibrosis was assessed by serum biomarkers APRI, FIB-4 and Forns, and Advanced Liver Fibrosis (ALF) was defined if APRI > 1.5, FIB-4 > 3.25 or Forns > 6.9. Correlations were analyzed by Pearson's coefficients and logistic regression models were used. Results: 1313 patients (80{\%} M) had complete data; age at admission was 45 years (IQR: 39–52 yrs), age of initial regular alcohol consumption was 20 years (IQR: 17–26 yrs) and the amount of alcohol consumed preceding admission was 200 g/day (IQR: 120–270 g/day). Prevalence of HCV infection was 18{\%}. Prevalence of ALF in HCV positive patients was 40.6{\%} by APRI, 30.6{\%} by FIB-4, and 43.3{\%} by Forns. Correlations were high for APRI vs. FIB-4 r = 0.906, APRI vs. Forns r = 0.710, and, FIB-4 vs. Forns r = 0.825. There was no significant difference in the APRI/FIB-4 correlation by HCV status (z = 1.35, p = 0.177). However, the APRI/Forns correlation was significantly higher in HCV positive patients (p < 0.001). Patients with HCV infection were two times more likely to present with ALF at admission (OR = 2.1, 95{\%}CI:1.5–3.1). Conclusions: HCV infection is associated with severity of fibrosis in patients with excessive alcohol consumption. In this context, APRI and FIB-4 are highly correlated which facilitates the assessment of liver damage.",
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T1 - Do serum markers of liver fibrosis vary by HCV infection in patients with alcohol use disorder?

AU - Sanvisens, Arantza

AU - Munoz, Alvaro

AU - Bolao, Ferran

AU - Zuluaga, Paola

AU - Farré, Magí

AU - Jarrin, Inmaculada

AU - Tor, Jordi

AU - Muga, Roberto

PY - 2018/7/1

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N2 - Introduction: HCV infection is frequent in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Ethanol and hepatitis C have a synergistic effect that increases the risk of end-stage liver disease. We aimed to assess fibrosis of the liver in patients admitted to treatment of AUD. Methods: Data were collected in two hospital units between 2000 and 2014. Liver fibrosis was assessed by serum biomarkers APRI, FIB-4 and Forns, and Advanced Liver Fibrosis (ALF) was defined if APRI > 1.5, FIB-4 > 3.25 or Forns > 6.9. Correlations were analyzed by Pearson's coefficients and logistic regression models were used. Results: 1313 patients (80% M) had complete data; age at admission was 45 years (IQR: 39–52 yrs), age of initial regular alcohol consumption was 20 years (IQR: 17–26 yrs) and the amount of alcohol consumed preceding admission was 200 g/day (IQR: 120–270 g/day). Prevalence of HCV infection was 18%. Prevalence of ALF in HCV positive patients was 40.6% by APRI, 30.6% by FIB-4, and 43.3% by Forns. Correlations were high for APRI vs. FIB-4 r = 0.906, APRI vs. Forns r = 0.710, and, FIB-4 vs. Forns r = 0.825. There was no significant difference in the APRI/FIB-4 correlation by HCV status (z = 1.35, p = 0.177). However, the APRI/Forns correlation was significantly higher in HCV positive patients (p < 0.001). Patients with HCV infection were two times more likely to present with ALF at admission (OR = 2.1, 95%CI:1.5–3.1). Conclusions: HCV infection is associated with severity of fibrosis in patients with excessive alcohol consumption. In this context, APRI and FIB-4 are highly correlated which facilitates the assessment of liver damage.

AB - Introduction: HCV infection is frequent in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Ethanol and hepatitis C have a synergistic effect that increases the risk of end-stage liver disease. We aimed to assess fibrosis of the liver in patients admitted to treatment of AUD. Methods: Data were collected in two hospital units between 2000 and 2014. Liver fibrosis was assessed by serum biomarkers APRI, FIB-4 and Forns, and Advanced Liver Fibrosis (ALF) was defined if APRI > 1.5, FIB-4 > 3.25 or Forns > 6.9. Correlations were analyzed by Pearson's coefficients and logistic regression models were used. Results: 1313 patients (80% M) had complete data; age at admission was 45 years (IQR: 39–52 yrs), age of initial regular alcohol consumption was 20 years (IQR: 17–26 yrs) and the amount of alcohol consumed preceding admission was 200 g/day (IQR: 120–270 g/day). Prevalence of HCV infection was 18%. Prevalence of ALF in HCV positive patients was 40.6% by APRI, 30.6% by FIB-4, and 43.3% by Forns. Correlations were high for APRI vs. FIB-4 r = 0.906, APRI vs. Forns r = 0.710, and, FIB-4 vs. Forns r = 0.825. There was no significant difference in the APRI/FIB-4 correlation by HCV status (z = 1.35, p = 0.177). However, the APRI/Forns correlation was significantly higher in HCV positive patients (p < 0.001). Patients with HCV infection were two times more likely to present with ALF at admission (OR = 2.1, 95%CI:1.5–3.1). Conclusions: HCV infection is associated with severity of fibrosis in patients with excessive alcohol consumption. In this context, APRI and FIB-4 are highly correlated which facilitates the assessment of liver damage.

KW - Alcohol use disorder

KW - Hepatitis C virus

KW - Liver fibrosis

KW - Markers of fibrosis

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