Do prostaglandins lead to ovulation in the rabbit by stimulating proteolytic enzyme activity?

T. Miyazaki, E. Katz, A. M. Dharmarajan, Edward E Wallach, S. J. Atlas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine if prostaglandins (PGs) have a direct effect on the ovarian proteolytic enzyme system by examining ultrastructure of the follicle wall and the microvasculature in the presence and absence of indomethacin and by using the isolated perfused rabbit ovary. Design: Nine hours after administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or hCG plus indomethacin, follicles were removed and processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Isolated perfused rabbit ovaries were induced to ovulate with PGF(2α) (100 ng/mL) in the presence and absence of tranexamic acid (0.1, 1.0, or 10 mM), a plasminogen activator inhibitor. Results: The addition of indomethacin to hCG inhibited ovulation and production of PGs without affecting the follicular microvasculature. However, the changes in follicle wall architecture were less pronounced after treatment with indomethacin. Ovulatory efficiency in response to PGF(2α) (the percent of follicles > 1.5 mm that ovulate) was significantly reduced (P <0.01) by 10 mM tranexamic acid. Conclusions: These results suggest that PGs induce follicular rupture by activation of proteolytic enzymes located in the follicle wall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1188
Number of pages6
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume55
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1991

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Ovulation
Indomethacin
Prostaglandins
Peptide Hydrolases
Chorionic Gonadotropin
Rabbits
Tranexamic Acid
Prostaglandins F
Microvessels
Ovary
Plasminogen Inactivators
Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy
Rupture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Miyazaki, T., Katz, E., Dharmarajan, A. M., Wallach, E. E., & Atlas, S. J. (1991). Do prostaglandins lead to ovulation in the rabbit by stimulating proteolytic enzyme activity? Fertility and Sterility, 55(6), 1183-1188.

Do prostaglandins lead to ovulation in the rabbit by stimulating proteolytic enzyme activity? / Miyazaki, T.; Katz, E.; Dharmarajan, A. M.; Wallach, Edward E; Atlas, S. J.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 55, No. 6, 1991, p. 1183-1188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miyazaki, T, Katz, E, Dharmarajan, AM, Wallach, EE & Atlas, SJ 1991, 'Do prostaglandins lead to ovulation in the rabbit by stimulating proteolytic enzyme activity?', Fertility and Sterility, vol. 55, no. 6, pp. 1183-1188.
Miyazaki, T. ; Katz, E. ; Dharmarajan, A. M. ; Wallach, Edward E ; Atlas, S. J. / Do prostaglandins lead to ovulation in the rabbit by stimulating proteolytic enzyme activity?. In: Fertility and Sterility. 1991 ; Vol. 55, No. 6. pp. 1183-1188.
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