Do Nonclinical Community-Based Youth-Serving Professionals Talk With Young Men About Sexual and Reproductive Health and Intend to Refer Them for Care?

Arik V. Marcell, Susannah E. Gibbs, Shalynn R. Howard, Nanlesta Autumn Pilgrim, Jacky M. Jennings, Renata Sanders, Kathleen R. Page, Penny S. Loosier, Patricia J. Dittus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young men (ages 15–24) may benefit from community-based connections to care since many have sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs and low care use. This study describes nonclinical community-based youth-serving professionals’ (YSPs) SRH knowledge, confidence, past behaviors, and future intentions to talk with young men about SRH and refer them to care, and examines factors associated with care referral intentions. YSPs (n = 158) from 22 settings in one mid-Atlantic city answered questions about the study’s goal, their demographics and work environment from August 2014 to December 2015. Poisson regression assessed factors associated with YSPs’ care referral intentions. On average, YSPs answered 58% of knowledge questions correctly, knew 5 of 8 SRH care dimensions of where to refer young men, and perceived being somewhat/very confident talking with young men about SRH (63%) and referring them to care (77%). During the past month, the majority (63%) talked with young men about SRH but only one-third made care referrals; the majority (66%) were somewhat/very likely to refer them to care in the next 3 months. Adjusted models indicated YSPs were more likely to refer young men if they had a very supportive work environment to talk about SRH (adjusted RR = 1.51, 95% CI [1.15, 1.98]), greater confidence in SRH care referral (1.28 [1.00, 1.62]), and greater SRH care referrals in the past month (1.16 [1.02, 1.33]). Nonclinical community-based YSPs have poor-to-moderate knowledge about young men’s SRH care, and less than one-third reported referrals in the past month. Findings have implications for educating YSPs about young men’s SRH care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1046-1054
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • access to health care
  • adolescents and young adults
  • community organizations
  • health education
  • men’s health
  • reproductive health
  • sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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