Do neurocognitive ability and personality traits account for different aspects of psychosocial outcome after traumatic brain injury?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine the contributions of demographic, injury, cognitive, and personality characteristics to psychosocial outcome 8 years after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: Multiple regression analyses were used to estimate the variance explained by putative 'predictors' of psychosocial outcome. Participants: Thirty-nine TBI survivors and 39 family member informants. On the basis of Glasgow Coma Scale scores and Accident Injury Severity (head) ratings, the patients' brain injuries ranged from mild to critical in severity. Main Outcome Measures: One self-report measure combined putative markers of social role engagement, such as marital status and earned income. Another, based on informant ratings using the Katz Adjustment Scale, was conceptualized as reflecting behavioral adjustment. Results: Whereas cognitive functioning explained significant unique variation in social role engagement, it did not account for variance in behavioral adjustment. Conversely, whereas 3 personality trait ratings explained significant incremental variance in behavioral stability, only 1 did the same with respect to social role engagement. Conclusions: Social role engagement and behavioral adjustment appear to represent 2 related but distinguishable aspects of TBI outcome that are associated with different patient characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-273
Number of pages14
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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