Do iodine water purification tablets provide an effective barrier against Cryptosporidium parvum?

Jeffrey A. Starke, Dwight D. Bowman, Michael Labare, Elizabeth A. Fogarty, Araceli Lucio-Forster, Joseph Barbi, Michael B. Jenkins, Mary Pavlo, Michael A. Butkus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

U.S. Army Iodine Water Purification Tablets were tested to determine their efficacy against Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan resistant to chemical disinfection. Purified oocysts in phosphate-buffered water were treated with varying concentrations of iodine or with iodine tablets as per U.S. Army protocol. Neonatal mouse pups were then each inoculated with 10,000 treated oocysts, and 1 week later scored as infected or uninfected. Using this methodology, iodine tablets were found to be inadequate against C. parvum because the Army doctrinal dose of 560 mg min/L, calculated as 16 mg of I 2/L and 35 minutes of contact time, showed less than 1 log inactivation. A dose of 29 mg of I2/L at the same contact time was required to achieve a 2 log inactivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-86
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume170
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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