Do in utero events contribute to current health disparities in reproductive medicine?

May Tal Sauerbrun-Cutler, James H. Segars

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Health disparities exist in reproductive medicine as discussed in detail in the subsequent articles of this issue; however, in most cases, the exact cause of these differences is unknown. Some of these disparities can be linked to environmental exposures such as alcohol and other hazardous toxic exposures (polycarbonate, pesticides, nicotine) in adults. In addition, low socioeconomic status, behavioral risk factors, and lack of education have been linked to poor obstetric and reproductive outcomes in minority groups. Aside from these various environmental exposures later in life, there is evidence that adverse events in utero could contribute to poor reproductive outcome in specific minority groups. We will focus on the developmental origins of health and disease as a possible causal mechanism for health disparities in reproductive diseases, as this perspective may suggest tractable solutions of how to address and eliminate these health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-332
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in reproductive medicine
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2013

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Keywords

  • African Americans
  • DOHaD
  • obesity
  • preterm birth
  • preterm labor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Physiology (medical)

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