Do early postoperative CT findings following type A aortic dissection repair predict early clinical outcome?

Linda Chi Hang Chu, Joel Price, Allen Young, Duke E. Cameron, Elliot K Fishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purposes of this study are to determine the prevalence of specific postoperative CT findings following Stanford type A aortic dissection repair in the early postoperative period and to determine if these postoperative findings are predictive of adverse clinical outcome. Methods: Patients who underwent type A dissection repair between January 2012 and December 2014 were identified from our institutional cardiac surgery database. Postoperative CT exams within 1 month of surgery were retrospectively reviewed to determine sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Poor early clinical outcome was defined as length of stay (LOS) > 14 days. Student’s t test and chi-square test were used to determine the relationship between postoperative CT features and early clinical outcome. Results: Thirty-nine patients (24 M, 15 F, mean age 58.5 ± 13.7 years) underwent type A dissection repair and mean LOS was 17.3 ± 21.2 days. A subset of 19 patients underwent postoperative CTs within 30 days of surgery, and there was no significant relationship between LOS and sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Conclusions: CT features such as mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid were ubiquitous in the early postoperative period. There was no consistent CT feature or threshold that could reliably differentiate between “normal postoperative findings” and early postoperative complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalEmergency Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 18 2016

Fingerprint

Mediastinal Emphysema
Dissection
Length of Stay
Pneumothorax
Postoperative Period
Lung
Chi-Square Distribution
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Thoracic Surgery
Databases
Students
Pericardial Fluid
galantide

Keywords

  • Aortic dissection
  • Aortic root replacement
  • CT
  • Postoperative complications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Do early postoperative CT findings following type A aortic dissection repair predict early clinical outcome? / Chu, Linda Chi Hang; Price, Joel; Young, Allen; Cameron, Duke E.; Fishman, Elliot K.

In: Emergency Radiology, 18.11.2016, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{500a347832544da4ad2ce8870558a7ef,
title = "Do early postoperative CT findings following type A aortic dissection repair predict early clinical outcome?",
abstract = "Purpose: The purposes of this study are to determine the prevalence of specific postoperative CT findings following Stanford type A aortic dissection repair in the early postoperative period and to determine if these postoperative findings are predictive of adverse clinical outcome. Methods: Patients who underwent type A dissection repair between January 2012 and December 2014 were identified from our institutional cardiac surgery database. Postoperative CT exams within 1 month of surgery were retrospectively reviewed to determine sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Poor early clinical outcome was defined as length of stay (LOS) > 14 days. Student’s t test and chi-square test were used to determine the relationship between postoperative CT features and early clinical outcome. Results: Thirty-nine patients (24 M, 15 F, mean age 58.5 ± 13.7 years) underwent type A dissection repair and mean LOS was 17.3 ± 21.2 days. A subset of 19 patients underwent postoperative CTs within 30 days of surgery, and there was no significant relationship between LOS and sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Conclusions: CT features such as mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid were ubiquitous in the early postoperative period. There was no consistent CT feature or threshold that could reliably differentiate between “normal postoperative findings” and early postoperative complications.",
keywords = "Aortic dissection, Aortic root replacement, CT, Postoperative complications",
author = "Chu, {Linda Chi Hang} and Joel Price and Allen Young and Cameron, {Duke E.} and Fishman, {Elliot K}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1007/s10140-016-1467-1",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Emergency Radiology",
issn = "1070-3004",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do early postoperative CT findings following type A aortic dissection repair predict early clinical outcome?

AU - Chu, Linda Chi Hang

AU - Price, Joel

AU - Young, Allen

AU - Cameron, Duke E.

AU - Fishman, Elliot K

PY - 2016/11/18

Y1 - 2016/11/18

N2 - Purpose: The purposes of this study are to determine the prevalence of specific postoperative CT findings following Stanford type A aortic dissection repair in the early postoperative period and to determine if these postoperative findings are predictive of adverse clinical outcome. Methods: Patients who underwent type A dissection repair between January 2012 and December 2014 were identified from our institutional cardiac surgery database. Postoperative CT exams within 1 month of surgery were retrospectively reviewed to determine sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Poor early clinical outcome was defined as length of stay (LOS) > 14 days. Student’s t test and chi-square test were used to determine the relationship between postoperative CT features and early clinical outcome. Results: Thirty-nine patients (24 M, 15 F, mean age 58.5 ± 13.7 years) underwent type A dissection repair and mean LOS was 17.3 ± 21.2 days. A subset of 19 patients underwent postoperative CTs within 30 days of surgery, and there was no significant relationship between LOS and sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Conclusions: CT features such as mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid were ubiquitous in the early postoperative period. There was no consistent CT feature or threshold that could reliably differentiate between “normal postoperative findings” and early postoperative complications.

AB - Purpose: The purposes of this study are to determine the prevalence of specific postoperative CT findings following Stanford type A aortic dissection repair in the early postoperative period and to determine if these postoperative findings are predictive of adverse clinical outcome. Methods: Patients who underwent type A dissection repair between January 2012 and December 2014 were identified from our institutional cardiac surgery database. Postoperative CT exams within 1 month of surgery were retrospectively reviewed to determine sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Poor early clinical outcome was defined as length of stay (LOS) > 14 days. Student’s t test and chi-square test were used to determine the relationship between postoperative CT features and early clinical outcome. Results: Thirty-nine patients (24 M, 15 F, mean age 58.5 ± 13.7 years) underwent type A dissection repair and mean LOS was 17.3 ± 21.2 days. A subset of 19 patients underwent postoperative CTs within 30 days of surgery, and there was no significant relationship between LOS and sizes and attenuation of mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid, and the presence or absence of pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, or lung consolidation. Conclusions: CT features such as mediastinal, pericardial, and pleural fluid were ubiquitous in the early postoperative period. There was no consistent CT feature or threshold that could reliably differentiate between “normal postoperative findings” and early postoperative complications.

KW - Aortic dissection

KW - Aortic root replacement

KW - CT

KW - Postoperative complications

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84995756453&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84995756453&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10140-016-1467-1

DO - 10.1007/s10140-016-1467-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 27864636

AN - SCOPUS:84995756453

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - Emergency Radiology

JF - Emergency Radiology

SN - 1070-3004

ER -