Do children and their parents eat a similar diet? Resemblance in child and parental dietary intake: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Youfa Wang, M. A. Beydoun, J. Li, Y. Liu, L. A. Moreno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Parents are believed to have a strong influence on children's eating behaviours. However, previous findings on child-parent resemblance in dietary intakes are mixed. We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the association (correlations) based on published studies. Methods: We searched related studies published since 1980 and found 24 studies meeting inclusion criteria for review and 15 for meta-regression analysis. We compared the associations between parentechild pairs, nutrients, over time and by dietary assessment method. Results: Most studies were based on small samples. Overall, they suggest a moderate or weak association, but findings varied remarkably. Our meta-analysis showed that average Fisher's transformed correlations were 0.20 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.28) for fat (% energy); for energy, 0.21 (0.18 to 0.24). The correlations varied by parent-child pairs, dietary assessment and countries. Food frequency questionnaires or mixed approaches yielded lower correlation than 24-h recalls or food records. Child self-reported intakes showed weaker correlation and better methodology quality showed stronger correlation in fat intake (% energy), which also became weaker over time. Conclusions Overall, the resemblance is weak, and it varied considerably across studies, nutrients, foods and parent-child pairs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-189
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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Meta-Analysis
Parents
Diet
Food
Fats
Child Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Energy Intake
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

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Do children and their parents eat a similar diet? Resemblance in child and parental dietary intake : Systematic review and meta-analysis. / Wang, Youfa; Beydoun, M. A.; Li, J.; Liu, Y.; Moreno, L. A.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 65, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 177-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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