Do basic laboratory tests or clinical observations predict bleeding in thrombocytopenic oncology patients? A reevaluation of phrophylactic platelet transfusion

Alison M. Friedmann, Haydar Sengul, Harold Lehmann, Cindy Schwartz, Steven Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine which clinical and laboratory features correlate with serious hemorrhage in thrombocytopenic oncology patients. A retrospective review was conducted of all thrombocytopenic adult patients admitted to the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, MD, over the last 10 years. We performed multiple logistic regression analysis on 2942 patients looking at the frequency of serious bleeding as a function of platelet count and numerous features that may correlate with hemorrhage. Multivariate analyses showed no relationship between either the first morning platelet count or the lowest platelet count of the day and the risk of hemorrhage. Of the other features we examined, several correlated independently with bleeding, including uremia (odds ratio [OR] 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40 to 1.92), hypoalbuminemia (OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.79), recent bone marrow transplantation (OR 1.32; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.43), and recent hemorrhage (OR 6.72; 95% CI, 5.53 to 8.18). Leukopenia was associated with a decreased risk of bleeding (OR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.82). Although this large study identified a number of clinical and laboratory features that correlated significantly with bleeding, the ORs of these factors were not large and all were much less than previous bleeding. These findings suggest that the major goal of transfusion support should be the aggressive therapeutic use of blood products rather than prophylactic use based on such weak clinical correlates and on the platelet count, which was not a correlate at all in multivariate analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-45
Number of pages12
JournalTransfusion medicine reviews
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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