Do Baseline Asthma and Allergic Sensitization Characteristics Predict Responsiveness to Mouse Allergen Reduction?

Ammara Ahmed, Christy Sadreameli, Jean Curtin-Brosnan, Torie Grant, Wanda Phipatanakul, Matthew Perzanowski, Susan Balcer-Whaley, Roger Peng, Michelle Newman, Amparito Cunningham, Adnan Divjan, Mary E. Bollinger, Robert A Wise, Rachel Miller, Ginger Chew, Elizabeth C. Matsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mouse allergen reduction is associated with improvements in asthma among sensitized and exposed children, but whether clinical characteristics predict responsiveness to allergen reduction is unclear. Objective: To examine the effects of clinical characteristics on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of a mouse allergen intervention, examining the effects of atopy, demographic characteristics, lung function, asthma control, and asthma severity on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Results: Participants were predominantly low-income and minority (78% black, 22% Hispanic), and had persistent asthma. Among less atopic participants (<6 positive skin prick test results), each 50% reduction in mouse allergen was associated with fewer symptoms (incidence rate ratio [95% CI]: maximal symptoms: 0.94 [0.92-0.96]). There was little effect of mouse allergen reduction on symptoms among more atopic participants (P > .05). The interactions between atopic status and mouse allergen reduction were statistically significant for all symptom outcomes; however, there was no evidence that atopic status influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on exacerbation-related outcomes. Older children (≥9 years) tended to experience greater improvement in some asthma outcomes with reduction in mouse allergen exposure than younger children. There was no evidence that either mouse-specific IgE or lung function influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on any asthma outcomes. Conclusions: Although there may be variability in the clinical response to mouse allergen reduction among low-income, minority children with asthma, there were no clinical characteristics that clearly identified a subgroup at which the intervention should be targeted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Allergens
Asthma
Lung
Hispanic Americans
Immunoglobulin E
Randomized Controlled Trials
Demography

Keywords

  • Allergen exposure
  • Allergen exposure reduction
  • Allergen sensitization
  • Allergic asthma
  • Atopy
  • Mouse allergen exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Do Baseline Asthma and Allergic Sensitization Characteristics Predict Responsiveness to Mouse Allergen Reduction? / Ahmed, Ammara; Sadreameli, Christy; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; Grant, Torie; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Perzanowski, Matthew; Balcer-Whaley, Susan; Peng, Roger; Newman, Michelle; Cunningham, Amparito; Divjan, Adnan; Bollinger, Mary E.; Wise, Robert A; Miller, Rachel; Chew, Ginger; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmed, A, Sadreameli, C, Curtin-Brosnan, J, Grant, T, Phipatanakul, W, Perzanowski, M, Balcer-Whaley, S, Peng, R, Newman, M, Cunningham, A, Divjan, A, Bollinger, ME, Wise, RA, Miller, R, Chew, G & Matsui, EC 2019, 'Do Baseline Asthma and Allergic Sensitization Characteristics Predict Responsiveness to Mouse Allergen Reduction?', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2019.08.044
Ahmed, Ammara ; Sadreameli, Christy ; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean ; Grant, Torie ; Phipatanakul, Wanda ; Perzanowski, Matthew ; Balcer-Whaley, Susan ; Peng, Roger ; Newman, Michelle ; Cunningham, Amparito ; Divjan, Adnan ; Bollinger, Mary E. ; Wise, Robert A ; Miller, Rachel ; Chew, Ginger ; Matsui, Elizabeth C. / Do Baseline Asthma and Allergic Sensitization Characteristics Predict Responsiveness to Mouse Allergen Reduction?. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: Mouse allergen reduction is associated with improvements in asthma among sensitized and exposed children, but whether clinical characteristics predict responsiveness to allergen reduction is unclear. Objective: To examine the effects of clinical characteristics on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of a mouse allergen intervention, examining the effects of atopy, demographic characteristics, lung function, asthma control, and asthma severity on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Results: Participants were predominantly low-income and minority (78{\%} black, 22{\%} Hispanic), and had persistent asthma. Among less atopic participants (<6 positive skin prick test results), each 50{\%} reduction in mouse allergen was associated with fewer symptoms (incidence rate ratio [95{\%} CI]: maximal symptoms: 0.94 [0.92-0.96]). There was little effect of mouse allergen reduction on symptoms among more atopic participants (P > .05). The interactions between atopic status and mouse allergen reduction were statistically significant for all symptom outcomes; however, there was no evidence that atopic status influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on exacerbation-related outcomes. Older children (≥9 years) tended to experience greater improvement in some asthma outcomes with reduction in mouse allergen exposure than younger children. There was no evidence that either mouse-specific IgE or lung function influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on any asthma outcomes. Conclusions: Although there may be variability in the clinical response to mouse allergen reduction among low-income, minority children with asthma, there were no clinical characteristics that clearly identified a subgroup at which the intervention should be targeted.",
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AU - Ahmed, Ammara

AU - Sadreameli, Christy

AU - Curtin-Brosnan, Jean

AU - Grant, Torie

AU - Phipatanakul, Wanda

AU - Perzanowski, Matthew

AU - Balcer-Whaley, Susan

AU - Peng, Roger

AU - Newman, Michelle

AU - Cunningham, Amparito

AU - Divjan, Adnan

AU - Bollinger, Mary E.

AU - Wise, Robert A

AU - Miller, Rachel

AU - Chew, Ginger

AU - Matsui, Elizabeth C.

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N2 - Background: Mouse allergen reduction is associated with improvements in asthma among sensitized and exposed children, but whether clinical characteristics predict responsiveness to allergen reduction is unclear. Objective: To examine the effects of clinical characteristics on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial of a mouse allergen intervention, examining the effects of atopy, demographic characteristics, lung function, asthma control, and asthma severity on relationships between mouse allergen reduction and asthma outcomes. Results: Participants were predominantly low-income and minority (78% black, 22% Hispanic), and had persistent asthma. Among less atopic participants (<6 positive skin prick test results), each 50% reduction in mouse allergen was associated with fewer symptoms (incidence rate ratio [95% CI]: maximal symptoms: 0.94 [0.92-0.96]). There was little effect of mouse allergen reduction on symptoms among more atopic participants (P > .05). The interactions between atopic status and mouse allergen reduction were statistically significant for all symptom outcomes; however, there was no evidence that atopic status influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on exacerbation-related outcomes. Older children (≥9 years) tended to experience greater improvement in some asthma outcomes with reduction in mouse allergen exposure than younger children. There was no evidence that either mouse-specific IgE or lung function influenced the effect of mouse allergen reduction on any asthma outcomes. Conclusions: Although there may be variability in the clinical response to mouse allergen reduction among low-income, minority children with asthma, there were no clinical characteristics that clearly identified a subgroup at which the intervention should be targeted.

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