Distinguishing psychogenic from neurogenic dysfluency when neurologic and psychologic factors coexist

Donna Clark Tippett, Arthur A. Siebens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reports of acquired dysfluency emphasize the diagnostic importance of symptom reversibility in distinguishing a psychogenic from a neurogenic etiology. This paper describes the onset of dysfluency in a 23-year-old man who had anoxic encephalopathy with diffuse weakness and spasticity, pseudoseizures, and depression following an episode of status epilepticus. Differential diagnosis was complicated by the presence of both objective neurologic abnormalities and psychologic factors. The history, physical examination and analysis of speech characteristics were insufficient to make the diagnosis; however, the effect of a therapeutic trial strongly suggested psychogenicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-12
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Fluency Disorders
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

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