Distinct variation in vector competence among nine field populations of Aedes aegypti from a Brazilian dengue-endemic risk city

Caroline M. Gonçalves, Fabrício F. Melo, Juliana M T Bezerra, Bárbara A. Chaves, Breno M. Silva, Luciana D. Silva, José E M Pessanha, Jorge R. Arias, Nágila F C Secundino, Douglas Norris, Paulo F P Pimenta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In Brazil, dengue epidemics erupt sporadically throughout the country and it is unclear if outbreaks may initiate a sustainable transmission cycle. There are few studies evaluating the ability of Brazilian Aedes aegypti populations to transmit dengue virus (DENV). The aim of this study was to compare DENV susceptibility of field-captured Ae. aegypti populations from nine distinct geographic areas of the city of Belo Horizonte in 2009 and 2011. Infection Rate (IR), Vector Competence (VC) and Disseminated Infection Rate (DIR) were determined. Methods. Aedes aegypti eggs from each region were collected and reared separately in an insectary. Adult females were experimentally infected with DENV-2 and the virus was detected by qPCR in body and head samples. Data were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17. Results: IR varied from 40.0% to 82.5% in 2009 and 60.0% to 100.0% in 2011. VC ranged from 25.0% to 77.5% in 2009 and 25.0% to 80.0% in 2011. DIR oscillated from 68.7% to 100.0% in 2009 and 38.4% to 86.8 in 2011. When the results were evaluated by a logistic model using IR as covariate, North, Barreiro, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the strongest association in 2009. In 2011, a similar association was observed for South-Central, Venda Nova, West and Northeast regions. Using VC as covariate, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the most relevant association in 2009. In 2011, South-Central, Venda Nova and Barreiro presented the greatest revelation associations. When DIR data were analyzed by logistic regression models, Pampulha, South-Central, Venda Nova, West, Northeast and East (2009) as well as South-Central, Venda Nova and West (2011) were the districts showing the strongest associations. Conclusions: We conclude that Ae. aegypti populations from Belo Horizonte exhibit wide variation in vector competence to transmit dengue. Therefore, vector control strategies should be adapted to the available data for each region. Further analysis should be conducted to better understand the reasons for this large variability in vector competence and how these parameters correlate with epidemiological findings in subsequent years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number320
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 11 2014

Fingerprint

Dengue
Aedes
Mental Competency
Dengue Virus
Infection
Population
Logistic Models
Aptitude
Social Sciences
Eggs
Disease Outbreaks
Brazil
Head
Viruses

Keywords

  • Aedes aegypti
  • Dengue virus (DENV)
  • Disseminated infection rate
  • Field population
  • Infection rate
  • Vector competence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gonçalves, C. M., Melo, F. F., Bezerra, J. M. T., Chaves, B. A., Silva, B. M., Silva, L. D., ... Pimenta, P. F. P. (2014). Distinct variation in vector competence among nine field populations of Aedes aegypti from a Brazilian dengue-endemic risk city. Parasites and Vectors, 7(1), [320]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-7-320

Distinct variation in vector competence among nine field populations of Aedes aegypti from a Brazilian dengue-endemic risk city. / Gonçalves, Caroline M.; Melo, Fabrício F.; Bezerra, Juliana M T; Chaves, Bárbara A.; Silva, Breno M.; Silva, Luciana D.; Pessanha, José E M; Arias, Jorge R.; Secundino, Nágila F C; Norris, Douglas; Pimenta, Paulo F P.

In: Parasites and Vectors, Vol. 7, No. 1, 320, 11.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gonçalves, CM, Melo, FF, Bezerra, JMT, Chaves, BA, Silva, BM, Silva, LD, Pessanha, JEM, Arias, JR, Secundino, NFC, Norris, D & Pimenta, PFP 2014, 'Distinct variation in vector competence among nine field populations of Aedes aegypti from a Brazilian dengue-endemic risk city', Parasites and Vectors, vol. 7, no. 1, 320. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-7-320
Gonçalves, Caroline M. ; Melo, Fabrício F. ; Bezerra, Juliana M T ; Chaves, Bárbara A. ; Silva, Breno M. ; Silva, Luciana D. ; Pessanha, José E M ; Arias, Jorge R. ; Secundino, Nágila F C ; Norris, Douglas ; Pimenta, Paulo F P. / Distinct variation in vector competence among nine field populations of Aedes aegypti from a Brazilian dengue-endemic risk city. In: Parasites and Vectors. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: In Brazil, dengue epidemics erupt sporadically throughout the country and it is unclear if outbreaks may initiate a sustainable transmission cycle. There are few studies evaluating the ability of Brazilian Aedes aegypti populations to transmit dengue virus (DENV). The aim of this study was to compare DENV susceptibility of field-captured Ae. aegypti populations from nine distinct geographic areas of the city of Belo Horizonte in 2009 and 2011. Infection Rate (IR), Vector Competence (VC) and Disseminated Infection Rate (DIR) were determined. Methods. Aedes aegypti eggs from each region were collected and reared separately in an insectary. Adult females were experimentally infected with DENV-2 and the virus was detected by qPCR in body and head samples. Data were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17. Results: IR varied from 40.0{\%} to 82.5{\%} in 2009 and 60.0{\%} to 100.0{\%} in 2011. VC ranged from 25.0{\%} to 77.5{\%} in 2009 and 25.0{\%} to 80.0{\%} in 2011. DIR oscillated from 68.7{\%} to 100.0{\%} in 2009 and 38.4{\%} to 86.8 in 2011. When the results were evaluated by a logistic model using IR as covariate, North, Barreiro, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the strongest association in 2009. In 2011, a similar association was observed for South-Central, Venda Nova, West and Northeast regions. Using VC as covariate, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the most relevant association in 2009. In 2011, South-Central, Venda Nova and Barreiro presented the greatest revelation associations. When DIR data were analyzed by logistic regression models, Pampulha, South-Central, Venda Nova, West, Northeast and East (2009) as well as South-Central, Venda Nova and West (2011) were the districts showing the strongest associations. Conclusions: We conclude that Ae. aegypti populations from Belo Horizonte exhibit wide variation in vector competence to transmit dengue. Therefore, vector control strategies should be adapted to the available data for each region. Further analysis should be conducted to better understand the reasons for this large variability in vector competence and how these parameters correlate with epidemiological findings in subsequent years.",
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AU - Melo, Fabrício F.

AU - Bezerra, Juliana M T

AU - Chaves, Bárbara A.

AU - Silva, Breno M.

AU - Silva, Luciana D.

AU - Pessanha, José E M

AU - Arias, Jorge R.

AU - Secundino, Nágila F C

AU - Norris, Douglas

AU - Pimenta, Paulo F P

PY - 2014/7/11

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N2 - Background: In Brazil, dengue epidemics erupt sporadically throughout the country and it is unclear if outbreaks may initiate a sustainable transmission cycle. There are few studies evaluating the ability of Brazilian Aedes aegypti populations to transmit dengue virus (DENV). The aim of this study was to compare DENV susceptibility of field-captured Ae. aegypti populations from nine distinct geographic areas of the city of Belo Horizonte in 2009 and 2011. Infection Rate (IR), Vector Competence (VC) and Disseminated Infection Rate (DIR) were determined. Methods. Aedes aegypti eggs from each region were collected and reared separately in an insectary. Adult females were experimentally infected with DENV-2 and the virus was detected by qPCR in body and head samples. Data were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17. Results: IR varied from 40.0% to 82.5% in 2009 and 60.0% to 100.0% in 2011. VC ranged from 25.0% to 77.5% in 2009 and 25.0% to 80.0% in 2011. DIR oscillated from 68.7% to 100.0% in 2009 and 38.4% to 86.8 in 2011. When the results were evaluated by a logistic model using IR as covariate, North, Barreiro, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the strongest association in 2009. In 2011, a similar association was observed for South-Central, Venda Nova, West and Northeast regions. Using VC as covariate, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the most relevant association in 2009. In 2011, South-Central, Venda Nova and Barreiro presented the greatest revelation associations. When DIR data were analyzed by logistic regression models, Pampulha, South-Central, Venda Nova, West, Northeast and East (2009) as well as South-Central, Venda Nova and West (2011) were the districts showing the strongest associations. Conclusions: We conclude that Ae. aegypti populations from Belo Horizonte exhibit wide variation in vector competence to transmit dengue. Therefore, vector control strategies should be adapted to the available data for each region. Further analysis should be conducted to better understand the reasons for this large variability in vector competence and how these parameters correlate with epidemiological findings in subsequent years.

AB - Background: In Brazil, dengue epidemics erupt sporadically throughout the country and it is unclear if outbreaks may initiate a sustainable transmission cycle. There are few studies evaluating the ability of Brazilian Aedes aegypti populations to transmit dengue virus (DENV). The aim of this study was to compare DENV susceptibility of field-captured Ae. aegypti populations from nine distinct geographic areas of the city of Belo Horizonte in 2009 and 2011. Infection Rate (IR), Vector Competence (VC) and Disseminated Infection Rate (DIR) were determined. Methods. Aedes aegypti eggs from each region were collected and reared separately in an insectary. Adult females were experimentally infected with DENV-2 and the virus was detected by qPCR in body and head samples. Data were analyzed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17. Results: IR varied from 40.0% to 82.5% in 2009 and 60.0% to 100.0% in 2011. VC ranged from 25.0% to 77.5% in 2009 and 25.0% to 80.0% in 2011. DIR oscillated from 68.7% to 100.0% in 2009 and 38.4% to 86.8 in 2011. When the results were evaluated by a logistic model using IR as covariate, North, Barreiro, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the strongest association in 2009. In 2011, a similar association was observed for South-Central, Venda Nova, West and Northeast regions. Using VC as covariate, South-Central and Venda Nova showed the most relevant association in 2009. In 2011, South-Central, Venda Nova and Barreiro presented the greatest revelation associations. When DIR data were analyzed by logistic regression models, Pampulha, South-Central, Venda Nova, West, Northeast and East (2009) as well as South-Central, Venda Nova and West (2011) were the districts showing the strongest associations. Conclusions: We conclude that Ae. aegypti populations from Belo Horizonte exhibit wide variation in vector competence to transmit dengue. Therefore, vector control strategies should be adapted to the available data for each region. Further analysis should be conducted to better understand the reasons for this large variability in vector competence and how these parameters correlate with epidemiological findings in subsequent years.

KW - Aedes aegypti

KW - Dengue virus (DENV)

KW - Disseminated infection rate

KW - Field population

KW - Infection rate

KW - Vector competence

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