Disseminating childhood home injury risk reduction information in Pakistan: results from a community-based pilot study.

Aruna Chandran, Uzma Rahim Khan, Nukhba Zia, Asher Feroze, Sarah Stewart de Ramirez, Cheng Ming Huang, Junaid A. Razzak, Adnan Ali Hyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most childhood unintentional injuries occur in the home; however, very little home injury prevention information is tailored to developing countries. Utilizing our previously developed information dissemination tools and a hazard assessment checklist tailored to a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan, we pilot tested and compared the effectiveness of two dissemination tools. Two low-income neighborhoods were mapped, identifying families with a child aged between 12 and 59 months. In June and July 2010, all enrolled households underwent a home hazard assessment at the same time hazard reduction education was being given using an in-home tutorial or a pamphlet. A follow up assessment was conducted 4-5 months later. 503 households were enrolled; 256 received a tutorial and 247 a pamphlet. The two groups differed significantly (p < 0.01) in level of maternal education and relationship of the child to the primary caregiver. However, when controlling for these variables, those receiving an in-home tutorial had a higher odds of hazard reduction than the pamphlet group for uncovered vats of water (OR 2.14, 95% CI: 1.28, 3.58), an open fire within reach of the child (OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.80, 7.00), and inappropriately labeled cooking fuel containers (OR 1.86, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.25). This pilot project demonstrates the potential utility of using home-visit tutorials to decrease home hazards in a low-income neighborhood in Pakistan. A longer-term randomized study is needed to assess actual effectiveness of the use of allied health workers for home-based injury education and whether this results in decreased home injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1124
Number of pages12
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Disseminating childhood home injury risk reduction information in Pakistan: results from a community-based pilot study.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this