Disruptive behaviour disorders and disruptive symptoms after severe paediatric traumatic brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine pre-injury prevalence and post-injury incidence of DSM-III-R oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD), increase in disruptive symptoms after severe paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and risk factors associated with development of these disturbances. Methods: Ninety-four children were followed 1 one year after severe TBI. Assessments of pre-injury and 1-year psychiatric status were ascertained by parent report. The 1-year incidence of disruptive behaviour disorders/symptoms was the main outcome measure. Results: The pre-injury prevalence of ODD and CD in the TBI sample was 6% and 8%, respectively, the prevalence of pre-injury CD being significantly higher than in a reference population. The incidence of new-onset ODD and CD 1-year post-injury was 9% and 8%, respectively, the incidence of new-onset CD being significantly higher than in a reference population. ODD symptoms and total number of disruptive symptoms increased significantly over the first post-injury year. Significant risk factors for disruptive disorders/symptoms included higher pre-injury psychosocial adversity, delinquency ratings and affective lability. Conclusions: Pre-injury conduct disorder is a significant risk factor for post-injury disruptive behaviours. New-onset CD and disruptive symptoms are consequences of TBI at 1-year post-injury. Risk factors for these post-injury disturbances are similar to risk factors in non-TBI populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)944-955
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Injury
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Keywords

  • Conduct disorder
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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