Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids

Richard Sadovsky, Nancy Collins, Ann P. Tighe, Richard Safeer, Charlene M. Morris, Stephen A. Brunton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although there is an enormous amount of information available on omega-3 fatty acids, it is sometimes misleading, contradictory, and unsupported by scientific fact. Consumers and medical professionals may be confused regarding the potential value of omega-3 fatty acid supplements, despite having either read or heard about fish oil consumption and/or omega-3 fatty acid benefits and risks. The availability of a prescription formulation of omega-3-acid ethyl esters (P-OM3) has provided important new information that helps to dispel the myths and alleviate concerns surrounding the use of omega-3 fatty acids in clinical practice. The safety and efficacy of P-OM3, but not dietary-supplement omega-3 fatty acids, are documented in placebo-controlled trials. In general, studies using Food and Drug Administration-approved dosages of P-OM3 have not substantiated various myths surrounding the negative effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Thus, there are now evidence-based clinical guidelines for the use of omega-3 fatty acids in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-100
Number of pages9
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Fish Oils
United States Food and Drug Administration
Dietary Supplements
Prescriptions
Esters
Placebos
Guidelines
Safety
Acids

Keywords

  • Dietary fats
  • Evidence-based medicine
  • Fatty acids
  • Omega-3 fatty acids
  • P-OM3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sadovsky, R., Collins, N., Tighe, A. P., Safeer, R., Morris, C. M., & Brunton, S. A. (2008). Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids. Postgraduate Medicine, 120(2), 92-100. https://doi.org/10.3810/pgm.2008.07.1796

Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids. / Sadovsky, Richard; Collins, Nancy; Tighe, Ann P.; Safeer, Richard; Morris, Charlene M.; Brunton, Stephen A.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 120, No. 2, 07.2008, p. 92-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sadovsky, R, Collins, N, Tighe, AP, Safeer, R, Morris, CM & Brunton, SA 2008, 'Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids', Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 120, no. 2, pp. 92-100. https://doi.org/10.3810/pgm.2008.07.1796
Sadovsky R, Collins N, Tighe AP, Safeer R, Morris CM, Brunton SA. Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids. Postgraduate Medicine. 2008 Jul;120(2):92-100. https://doi.org/10.3810/pgm.2008.07.1796
Sadovsky, Richard ; Collins, Nancy ; Tighe, Ann P. ; Safeer, Richard ; Morris, Charlene M. ; Brunton, Stephen A. / Dispelling the myths about omega-3 fatty acids. In: Postgraduate Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 120, No. 2. pp. 92-100.
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