Disparity in outcomes for adult Native American hemodialysis patients? Findings from the ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project, 1996 to 1999

Diane L. Frankenfield, Sheila H. Roman, Michael V. Rocco, Marjorie R. Bedinger, William M. McClellan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. There is a paucity of information regarding the quality of care for Native American hemodialysis patients. Outcomes, including 1-year hospitalization and mortality, for adult Native American in-center hemodialysis patients selected for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project were compared to those for white and black patients to determine if disparity in care existed for this group. Methods. Clinical data were abstracted from medical records for the last quarters of 1995 to 1998 and linked to United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data files for data on comorbidities and 1-year hospitalization and mortality. Associations of race were tested by bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard modeling. Results. Two percent (467 of 27876) of patients were Native American, 37% black, and 51% white. Native American, compared to black and white patients, were more likely to have diabetes mellitus as the cause of ESRD (72%, 37%, and 38%, respectively, P < 0.01). In multivariate analyses, Native American patients were more likely to achieve a mean urea reduction ratio (URR) ≥ 65% compared to whites (referent) [hazards ratio (HR) (95% CI) 1.7 (1.3, 2.2)] and be dialyzed with an arteriovenous fistula [HR (95% CI) 1.7 (1.2, 2.5)]. They were as likely as Whites to achieve a mean hematocrit ≥33% and a mean serum albumin ≥4.0/3. 7 g/dL. In multivariate analyses, Native Americans were no more likely to be hospitalized or die during the follow-up period than whites. Conclusion. These data suggest that adult Native American hemodialysis patients experience equivalent or better dialytic care and are no more likely to experience 1-year hospitalization or mortality compared to whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1426-1434
Number of pages9
JournalKidney international
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alaska Native
  • American Indian
  • Disparity
  • Hospitalization
  • Morbidity
  • Mortality
  • Native American
  • Outcomes
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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