Disorders of Adjustment, Mood, and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents Undergoing Heart Transplantation and the Association of Ventricular Assist Device Support

Isaura Diaz, Cary Thurm, Matt Hall, Scott Auerbach, David W. Bearl, Debra A. Dodd, Bret A. Mettler, Andrew H. Smith, D. Catherine Fuchs, Justin Godown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and associated therapies in children during their heart transplantation admission. Study design: All pediatric heart transplant recipients (1999-2016) were included from a linked administrative and clinical registry database. Psychiatric disorders and associated therapies were identified using International Classification of Diseases or billing codes during the transplant admission. Data were analyzed using standard descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression assessed factors independently associated with psychiatric disorders or therapies. Results: A total of 3073 pediatric heart transplant recipients were included. Psychiatric disorders were present in 434 (14.1%) patients during the heart transplant admission, with adjustment disorders being the most common. Antidepressant therapy was prescribed to 212 patients (6.9%) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were most commonly used. Psychiatric diagnoses (8.4% vs 18.1%; P < .001) and the use of antidepressants (4.5% vs 8.9%; P < .001) increased over time (era 1, 1999-2009 vs era 2, 2010-2016). Psychiatric disorders were present in 39.8% of patients ≥8 years of age requiring ventricular assist device support at heart transplantation. The need for ventricular assist device support was independently associated with psychiatric diagnoses (aOR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.18-2.1; P = .002) and antidepressant therapy (aOR, 2.11; 95% CI. 1.43-3.12; P < .001). Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders are common in pediatric heart transplant recipients, especially among those bridged with ventricular assist device support. Psychiatric diagnoses and the use of antidepressants has increased over time, likely representing improved recognition of psychiatric comorbidities in this vulnerable population. Access to psychiatric services represents an important component of the multidisciplinary team caring for pediatric heart transplant recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-24.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume217
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adjustment disorder
  • depression
  • psychiatric disorders
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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