Disease disclosure in individuals with cystic fibrosis: Association with psychosocial and health outcomes

Adrienne P. Borschuk, Robin S. Everhart, Michelle N. Eakin, Devin Rand-Giovannetti, Belinda Borrelli, Kristin A. Riekert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background This study aimed to quantify cystic fibrosis (CF) disclosure and examine associations between disclosure and psychosocial and health outcomes. Methods Participants completed measures assessing disease disclosure and psychosocial outcomes. Data from chart reviews and pharmacy records were obtained. Results Participants (N = 128; ages 16–63) were more likely to disclose to romantic partners (97%) and close friends (94%) than to casual friends (79%), bosses (71%), or co-workers (53%). Participants reported more comfort discussing CF with and doing treatments in front of romantic partners and close friends than other groups. Disclosure was associated with higher social support, social functioning, and medication adherence self-efficacy. Lower lung-function was associated with disclosure to bosses and co-workers. Conclusions Clinicians should consider discussing disclosure with patients, as limited disclosure may have a negative impact on psychosocial outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)696-702
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cystic Fibrosis
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Disclosure
  • Medication adherence
  • Self-efficacy
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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