Discriminative stimulus effects of tramadol in humans

Angela N. Duke, George Bigelow, Ryan K. Lanier, Eric C Strain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tramadol is an unscheduled atypical analgesic that acts as an agonist at μ-opioid receptors and inhibits monoamine reuptake. Tramadol can suppress opioid withdrawal, and chronic administration can produce opioid physical dependence; however, diversion and abuse of tramadol is low. The present study further characterized tramadol in a three-choice discrimination procedure. Nondependent volunteers with active stimulant and opioid use (n = 8) participated in this residential laboratory study. Subjects were trained to discriminate between placebo, hydromorphone (8 mg), and methylphenidate (60 mg), and tests of acquisition confirmed that all volunteers could discriminate between the training drugs. The following drug conditions were then tested during discrimination test sessions: placebo, hydromorphone (4 and 8 mg), methylphenidate (30 and 60 mg), and tramadol (50, 100, 200, and 400 mg). In addition to discrimination measures, which included discrete choice, point distribution, and operant responding, subjective and physiological effects were measured for each test condition. Both doses of hydromorphone and methylphenidate were identified as hydromorphone-and methylphenidate-like, respectively. Lower doses of tramadol were generally identified as placebo, with higher doses (200 and 400 mg) identified as hydromorphone, or opioid-like. The highest dose of tramadol increased ratings on the stimulant scale, but was not significantly identified as methylphenidate-like. Tramadol did not significantly increase subjective ratings associated with reinforcement. Taken together, these results extend previous work with tramadol as a potential medication for the treatment of opioid dependence and withdrawal, showing acute doses of tramadol exhibit a profile of effects similar to opioid agonists and may have abuse liability in certain populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-262
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume338
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Tramadol
Hydromorphone
Methylphenidate
Opioid Analgesics
Placebos
Volunteers
Opioid Receptors
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Analgesics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Discriminative stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. / Duke, Angela N.; Bigelow, George; Lanier, Ryan K.; Strain, Eric C.

In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Vol. 338, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 255-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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