Discrimination between benign and malignant prostate biopsies using three-dimensional chromatin texture analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy

André Huisman, Lennert S. Ploeger, Hub F.J. Dullens, Trudy N. Jonges, Paul J. van Diest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the clinical usefulness of computing three-dimensional (3-D) nuclear texture features on prostate biopsy specimens to discriminate among benign, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and malignant specimens. Study Design: Twelve prostate cancer biopsy specimens were selected, diagnosed as either benign (N=4), PIN (N=4), or malignant (N=4). Sections 14 μm thick were stained. 3-D image stacks of selected benign and malignant areas were obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and analyzed off-line using in-house-developed software for 3-D semiautomated segmentation and calculation of texture features. The power of the 3-D texture features to discriminate among the pooled benign (N=1,507), PIN (N=673), and malignant nuclei (N=1,251) was established by multivariate linear discriminant analysis. Results: A total of 68.8% of the benign nuclei, 77.2% of the PIN nuclei, and 78.5% of the malignant nuclei could be classified correctly after cross validation. Conclusion: Quantification of changes in the distribution of nuclear chromatin by means of 3-D texture feature computation on CLSM images allows discriminating most benign and malignant prostate nuclei, which could be useful in cases that are difficult to diagnose morphologically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-270
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical and Quantitative Cytology and Histology
Volume33
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Keywords

  • Confocal laser scanning
  • Image analysis
  • Microscopy
  • Prostate cancer
  • Texture features

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Discrimination between benign and malignant prostate biopsies using three-dimensional chromatin texture analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this