Discrepancies between UN models and DHS survey estimates of maternal orphan prevalence: Insights from analyses of survey data from Zimbabwe

Laura Robertson, S. Gregson, C. Madanhire, Neff Walker, P. Mushati, G. Garnett, C. Nyamukapa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Model-based estimates of maternal (but not paternal) orphanhood are higher than those based on data from demographic and health surveys (DHS). We investigate the consistency of reporting of parental survival status in data from Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods: We compared estimates of paternal and maternal orphan prevalence in three rounds of a prospective household census in Manicaland (1998-2005) with estimates from DHS surveys and UNAIDS model projections. We investigated the consistency of reporting of parental survival status across the three rounds and compared estimates of adult mortality from the orphan data with direct estimates from concurrent follow-up of a general population cohort. Qualitative data were collected on possible reasons for misreporting. Results: Paternal and maternal orphan prevalence is increasing in Zimbabwe. Mothers reported as deceased in round 1 of the Manicaland survey were more likely than fathers to be reported as alive in rounds 2 or 3 (33.3% vs 13.4%). This pattern was most apparent among younger children. The qualitative findings suggest that foster parents sometimes claim adopted children as their natural children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with misreporting of foster parents as natural parents. This appears to be particularly common among foster mothers and could partly explain the discrepancy between mathematical model and DHS estimates of maternal orphanhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume84
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Zimbabwe
Orphaned Children
United Nations
Mothers
Demography
Parents
Survival
Censuses
Fathers
Surveys and Questionnaires
Theoretical Models
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Discrepancies between UN models and DHS survey estimates of maternal orphan prevalence : Insights from analyses of survey data from Zimbabwe. / Robertson, Laura; Gregson, S.; Madanhire, C.; Walker, Neff; Mushati, P.; Garnett, G.; Nyamukapa, C.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 84, No. SUPPL. 1, 08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robertson, Laura ; Gregson, S. ; Madanhire, C. ; Walker, Neff ; Mushati, P. ; Garnett, G. ; Nyamukapa, C. / Discrepancies between UN models and DHS survey estimates of maternal orphan prevalence : Insights from analyses of survey data from Zimbabwe. In: Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2008 ; Vol. 84, No. SUPPL. 1.
@article{289ff2e42ef24879aee6183b46cc4ab9,
title = "Discrepancies between UN models and DHS survey estimates of maternal orphan prevalence: Insights from analyses of survey data from Zimbabwe",
abstract = "Objectives: Model-based estimates of maternal (but not paternal) orphanhood are higher than those based on data from demographic and health surveys (DHS). We investigate the consistency of reporting of parental survival status in data from Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods: We compared estimates of paternal and maternal orphan prevalence in three rounds of a prospective household census in Manicaland (1998-2005) with estimates from DHS surveys and UNAIDS model projections. We investigated the consistency of reporting of parental survival status across the three rounds and compared estimates of adult mortality from the orphan data with direct estimates from concurrent follow-up of a general population cohort. Qualitative data were collected on possible reasons for misreporting. Results: Paternal and maternal orphan prevalence is increasing in Zimbabwe. Mothers reported as deceased in round 1 of the Manicaland survey were more likely than fathers to be reported as alive in rounds 2 or 3 (33.3{\%} vs 13.4{\%}). This pattern was most apparent among younger children. The qualitative findings suggest that foster parents sometimes claim adopted children as their natural children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with misreporting of foster parents as natural parents. This appears to be particularly common among foster mothers and could partly explain the discrepancy between mathematical model and DHS estimates of maternal orphanhood.",
author = "Laura Robertson and S. Gregson and C. Madanhire and Neff Walker and P. Mushati and G. Garnett and C. Nyamukapa",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1136/sti.2008.029926",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
journal = "Sexually Transmitted Infections",
issn = "1368-4973",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Discrepancies between UN models and DHS survey estimates of maternal orphan prevalence

T2 - Insights from analyses of survey data from Zimbabwe

AU - Robertson, Laura

AU - Gregson, S.

AU - Madanhire, C.

AU - Walker, Neff

AU - Mushati, P.

AU - Garnett, G.

AU - Nyamukapa, C.

PY - 2008/8

Y1 - 2008/8

N2 - Objectives: Model-based estimates of maternal (but not paternal) orphanhood are higher than those based on data from demographic and health surveys (DHS). We investigate the consistency of reporting of parental survival status in data from Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods: We compared estimates of paternal and maternal orphan prevalence in three rounds of a prospective household census in Manicaland (1998-2005) with estimates from DHS surveys and UNAIDS model projections. We investigated the consistency of reporting of parental survival status across the three rounds and compared estimates of adult mortality from the orphan data with direct estimates from concurrent follow-up of a general population cohort. Qualitative data were collected on possible reasons for misreporting. Results: Paternal and maternal orphan prevalence is increasing in Zimbabwe. Mothers reported as deceased in round 1 of the Manicaland survey were more likely than fathers to be reported as alive in rounds 2 or 3 (33.3% vs 13.4%). This pattern was most apparent among younger children. The qualitative findings suggest that foster parents sometimes claim adopted children as their natural children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with misreporting of foster parents as natural parents. This appears to be particularly common among foster mothers and could partly explain the discrepancy between mathematical model and DHS estimates of maternal orphanhood.

AB - Objectives: Model-based estimates of maternal (but not paternal) orphanhood are higher than those based on data from demographic and health surveys (DHS). We investigate the consistency of reporting of parental survival status in data from Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods: We compared estimates of paternal and maternal orphan prevalence in three rounds of a prospective household census in Manicaland (1998-2005) with estimates from DHS surveys and UNAIDS model projections. We investigated the consistency of reporting of parental survival status across the three rounds and compared estimates of adult mortality from the orphan data with direct estimates from concurrent follow-up of a general population cohort. Qualitative data were collected on possible reasons for misreporting. Results: Paternal and maternal orphan prevalence is increasing in Zimbabwe. Mothers reported as deceased in round 1 of the Manicaland survey were more likely than fathers to be reported as alive in rounds 2 or 3 (33.3% vs 13.4%). This pattern was most apparent among younger children. The qualitative findings suggest that foster parents sometimes claim adopted children as their natural children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with misreporting of foster parents as natural parents. This appears to be particularly common among foster mothers and could partly explain the discrepancy between mathematical model and DHS estimates of maternal orphanhood.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=49049102314&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=49049102314&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/sti.2008.029926

DO - 10.1136/sti.2008.029926

M3 - Article

C2 - 18647868

AN - SCOPUS:49049102314

VL - 84

JO - Sexually Transmitted Infections

JF - Sexually Transmitted Infections

SN - 1368-4973

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -