Disclosing medical errors to patients

It's not what you say, it's what they hear

Albert W Wu, I. Chan Huang, Samantha Stokes, Peter J. Pronovost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is consensus that patients should be told if they are injured by medical care. However, there is little information on how they react to different methods of disclosure. OBJECTIVE: To determine if volunteers' reactions to videos of physicians disclosing adverse events are related to the physician apologizing and accepting responsibility. DESIGN: Survey of viewers randomized to watch videos of disclosures of three adverse events (missed mammogram, chemotherapy overdose, delay in surgical therapy) with designed variations in extent of apology (full, non-specific, none) and acceptance of responsibility (full, none). PARTICIPANTS: Adult volunteer sample from the general community in Baltimore. MEASUREMENTS: Viewer evaluations of physicians in the videos using standardized scales. RESULTS: Of 200 volunteers, 50% were

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1012-1017
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Medical Errors
Volunteers
Disclosure
Physicians
Baltimore
Consensus
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Apology
  • Disclosure
  • Medical error
  • Patient perceptions
  • Video
  • Vignette

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Disclosing medical errors to patients : It's not what you say, it's what they hear. / Wu, Albert W; Huang, I. Chan; Stokes, Samantha; Pronovost, Peter J.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 1012-1017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Albert W ; Huang, I. Chan ; Stokes, Samantha ; Pronovost, Peter J. / Disclosing medical errors to patients : It's not what you say, it's what they hear. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 1012-1017.
@article{64264b26dc48404b92f698d1141ed81d,
title = "Disclosing medical errors to patients: It's not what you say, it's what they hear",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: There is consensus that patients should be told if they are injured by medical care. However, there is little information on how they react to different methods of disclosure. OBJECTIVE: To determine if volunteers' reactions to videos of physicians disclosing adverse events are related to the physician apologizing and accepting responsibility. DESIGN: Survey of viewers randomized to watch videos of disclosures of three adverse events (missed mammogram, chemotherapy overdose, delay in surgical therapy) with designed variations in extent of apology (full, non-specific, none) and acceptance of responsibility (full, none). PARTICIPANTS: Adult volunteer sample from the general community in Baltimore. MEASUREMENTS: Viewer evaluations of physicians in the videos using standardized scales. RESULTS: Of 200 volunteers, 50{\%} were",
keywords = "Apology, Disclosure, Medical error, Patient perceptions, Video, Vignette",
author = "Wu, {Albert W} and Huang, {I. Chan} and Samantha Stokes and Pronovost, {Peter J.}",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s11606-009-1044-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "1012--1017",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disclosing medical errors to patients

T2 - It's not what you say, it's what they hear

AU - Wu, Albert W

AU - Huang, I. Chan

AU - Stokes, Samantha

AU - Pronovost, Peter J.

PY - 2009/9

Y1 - 2009/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: There is consensus that patients should be told if they are injured by medical care. However, there is little information on how they react to different methods of disclosure. OBJECTIVE: To determine if volunteers' reactions to videos of physicians disclosing adverse events are related to the physician apologizing and accepting responsibility. DESIGN: Survey of viewers randomized to watch videos of disclosures of three adverse events (missed mammogram, chemotherapy overdose, delay in surgical therapy) with designed variations in extent of apology (full, non-specific, none) and acceptance of responsibility (full, none). PARTICIPANTS: Adult volunteer sample from the general community in Baltimore. MEASUREMENTS: Viewer evaluations of physicians in the videos using standardized scales. RESULTS: Of 200 volunteers, 50% were

AB - BACKGROUND: There is consensus that patients should be told if they are injured by medical care. However, there is little information on how they react to different methods of disclosure. OBJECTIVE: To determine if volunteers' reactions to videos of physicians disclosing adverse events are related to the physician apologizing and accepting responsibility. DESIGN: Survey of viewers randomized to watch videos of disclosures of three adverse events (missed mammogram, chemotherapy overdose, delay in surgical therapy) with designed variations in extent of apology (full, non-specific, none) and acceptance of responsibility (full, none). PARTICIPANTS: Adult volunteer sample from the general community in Baltimore. MEASUREMENTS: Viewer evaluations of physicians in the videos using standardized scales. RESULTS: Of 200 volunteers, 50% were

KW - Apology

KW - Disclosure

KW - Medical error

KW - Patient perceptions

KW - Video

KW - Vignette

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68949197263&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68949197263&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11606-009-1044-3

DO - 10.1007/s11606-009-1044-3

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 1012

EP - 1017

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

IS - 9

ER -