Disclosing medical errors: The view from the USA

Allen Kachalia, David W. Bates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Disclosure is increasingly seen as a key component of efforts to improve safety, but does not yet reliably occur in all organizations in the U.S. Approach: We describe the experience to date with disclosure in the U.S. and illustrate the issues with specific clinical examples. Both reputational and legal concerns represent substantial barriers. The evidence to date-mostly from single sites - shows that not only is disclosure the right thing to do, it also appears to decrease malpractice risk. We also discuss the related issue of compensation-practices around this vary greatly. Underlying the push for greater disclosure is also the belief that better disclosure results in an improved culture of safety, which in turn may improve the quality and safety of care. Conclusions: Providers have an ethical imperative to disclosure error to patients, and the limited available evidence shows that doing so actually decreases malpractice risk. While disclosure is not yet routine practice in the U.S., the approach is clearly gaining momentum. Telling patients what happened is not enough. They also deserve an apology, and if harmed, to be made whole emotionally and financially. Greater disclosure may not only help individual patients, but may also help with improving safety overall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalSurgeon
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disclosure
  • Ethics
  • Safety
  • Transparency
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Disclosing medical errors: The view from the USA'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this