Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells

Daniel F. McDonald, Brian H. Schofield, Elena M. Prezioso, Vicki L. Adams, Carmelita A. Frondoza, Sudhir M. Trivedi, Caren Craig, Richard L Humphrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cellular mechanism(s) responsible for tumor-associated bone resorption in multiple myeloma remain uncertain. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence is presented for the direct resorption of bone by mouse plasmacytomas. Morphological examination of autopsy specimens from tumorbearing mice revealed in vivo erosion of bony surfaces at sites of tumor cell-bone matrix apposition. No osteoclastic bone resorptive activity was evident. Using a 45Ca-labelled, devitalized bone explant assay system, mouse myeloma cells caused the release of isotope at levels from 200-300% above control values. Control cells such as normal spleen lymphocytes and liver cells did not resorb bone. Demonstration of the ability of myeloma cells to independently destroy bone is important to the understanding of the causes of and development of chemotherapeutic approaches to myelomatous bone resorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Letters
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

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Bone Resorption
Bone and Bones
Bone Matrix
Plasmacytoma
Multiple Myeloma
Isotopes
Autopsy
Neoplasms
Spleen
bone resorption factor
Lymphocytes
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Biology
  • Oncology

Cite this

McDonald, D. F., Schofield, B. H., Prezioso, E. M., Adams, V. L., Frondoza, C. A., Trivedi, S. M., ... Humphrey, R. L. (1983). Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells. Cancer Letters, 19(2), 119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(83)90145-3

Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells. / McDonald, Daniel F.; Schofield, Brian H.; Prezioso, Elena M.; Adams, Vicki L.; Frondoza, Carmelita A.; Trivedi, Sudhir M.; Craig, Caren; Humphrey, Richard L.

In: Cancer Letters, Vol. 19, No. 2, 1983, p. 119-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McDonald, DF, Schofield, BH, Prezioso, EM, Adams, VL, Frondoza, CA, Trivedi, SM, Craig, C & Humphrey, RL 1983, 'Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells', Cancer Letters, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(83)90145-3
McDonald DF, Schofield BH, Prezioso EM, Adams VL, Frondoza CA, Trivedi SM et al. Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells. Cancer Letters. 1983;19(2):119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3835(83)90145-3
McDonald, Daniel F. ; Schofield, Brian H. ; Prezioso, Elena M. ; Adams, Vicki L. ; Frondoza, Carmelita A. ; Trivedi, Sudhir M. ; Craig, Caren ; Humphrey, Richard L. / Direct bone resorbing activity of murine myeloma cells. In: Cancer Letters. 1983 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 119-124.
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