Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

Kent Ogden, Nathaniel Ordway, Dalanda Diallo, Gwen Tillapaugh-Fay, Can Aslan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2014
Subtitle of host publicationImage-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Print)9780819498298
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes
EventMedical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2014Feb 20 2014

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume9036
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/142/20/14

Fingerprint

vertebrae
Spine
3D printers
printers
surgery
Surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
orthopedics
Printing
Spinal Canal
spine
Body Height
canals
anatomy
Medical imaging
Orthopedics
Canals
Diagnostic Imaging
medicine
Cadaver

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • dimensional accuracy
  • orthopedic modeling
  • vertebral modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Ogden, K., Ordway, N., Diallo, D., Tillapaugh-Fay, G., & Aslan, C. (2014). Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra. In Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling [903629] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 9036). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2043489

Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra. / Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can.

Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling. SPIE, 2014. 903629 (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 9036).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ogden, K, Ordway, N, Diallo, D, Tillapaugh-Fay, G & Aslan, C 2014, Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra. in Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling., 903629, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 9036, SPIE, Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2043489
Ogden K, Ordway N, Diallo D, Tillapaugh-Fay G, Aslan C. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra. In Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling. SPIE. 2014. 903629. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2043489
Ogden, Kent ; Ordway, Nathaniel ; Diallo, Dalanda ; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen ; Aslan, Can. / Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra. Medical Imaging 2014: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling. SPIE, 2014. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
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