Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands

Dirk F. De Korne, Jeroen D H Van Wijngaarden, U. Frans Hiddema, Fred G. Bleeker, Peter J. Pronovost, Niek S. Klazinga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Many authors have advocated the diffusion of innovations from other high-risk industries into health care to improve safety. The aviation industry is comparable to health care because of its similarities in (a) the use of technology, (b) the requirement of highly specialized professional teams, and (c) the existence of risk and uncertainties. For almost 20 years, The Rotterdam Eye Hospital (Rotterdam, the Netherlands) has been engaged in diffusing several innovations adapted from aviation. Methods: A case-study methodology was used to assess the application of innovations in the hospital, with a focus on the context and the detailed mechanism for each innovation. Data on hospital performance outcomes were abstracted from the hospital information data management system, quality and safety reports, and the incident reporting system. Information on the innovations was obtained from a document search; observations; and semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Innovations: Aviation industry-based innovations diffused into patient care processes were as follows: patient planning and booking system, taxi service/valet parking, risk analysis (as applied to wrong-site surgery), time-out procedure (also for wrong-site surgery), Crew Resource Management training, and black box. Observations indicated that the innovations had a positive effect on quality and safety in the hospital: Waiting times were reduced, work processes became more standardized, the number of wrong-site surgeries decreased, and awareness of patient safety was heightened. Conclusion: A near-20-year experience with aviation-based innovation suggests that hospitals start with relatively simple innovations and use a systematic approach toward the goal of improving safety. Copyright 2010

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-347
Number of pages9
JournalJoint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety
Volume36
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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Aviation
Netherlands
Medical Errors
Safety
Industry
Diffusion of Innovation
Information Management
Health Care Sector
Risk Management
Patient Safety
Information Systems
Uncertainty
Patient Care
Interviews
Technology
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

De Korne, D. F., Van Wijngaarden, J. D. H., Hiddema, U. F., Bleeker, F. G., Pronovost, P. J., & Klazinga, N. S. (2010). Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, 36(8), 339-347.

Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands. / De Korne, Dirk F.; Van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Hiddema, U. Frans; Bleeker, Fred G.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Klazinga, Niek S.

In: Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, Vol. 36, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 339-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Korne, DF, Van Wijngaarden, JDH, Hiddema, UF, Bleeker, FG, Pronovost, PJ & Klazinga, NS 2010, 'Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands', Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 339-347.
De Korne DF, Van Wijngaarden JDH, Hiddema UF, Bleeker FG, Pronovost PJ, Klazinga NS. Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. 2010 Aug;36(8):339-347.
De Korne, Dirk F. ; Van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H ; Hiddema, U. Frans ; Bleeker, Fred G. ; Pronovost, Peter J. ; Klazinga, Niek S. / Diffusing aviation innovations in a hospital in the Netherlands. In: Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. 2010 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 339-347.
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