Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

D. L. Benson, P. J. Isackson, S. H.C. Hendry, E. G. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementary in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the α-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-α). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-α gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-α. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-α mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-α-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-α protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-α is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate. This suggests that the kinase may be differentially engaged in pre- and postsynaptic functions at certain synapses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1540-1564
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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