Differential effects of perceived stress on alcohol consumption in moderate versus heavy drinking HIV-infected women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To examine the association between perceived stress and subsequent alcohol use in women living with HIV. Methods Women (n = 338) receiving HIV care between April 2006 and July 2010 who enrolled in either a brief intervention for hazardous drinking or a cohort of non-hazardous drinkers completed a 90-day drinking and drug use history, and completed stress, depression and anxiety measures at 0, 6, and 12 months. We examined the association between perceived stress at months 0 or 6 and measures of quantity and frequency of alcohol use in months 3-6 and 9-12, respectively. Results The association between perceived stress and subsequent alcohol use depended on whether women were heavy or moderate drinkers at index visit. Among women reporting ≥7 drinks/week at index visit, high levels of perceived stress were associated with subsequent increased alcohol intake. However, among women reporting >0 but <7 drinks/week at index visit, high levels of perceived stress were associated with a subsequent reduction in drinking. Conclusions Baseline drinking status moderates the relationship between perceived stress and subsequent alcohol use. Perceived stress is an important therapeutic target in women who are heavy drinkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-385
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume178
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • HIV
  • Hazardous alcohol use
  • Perceived stress
  • Stress
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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