Differential Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Global Brain Volumes and White Matter Lesions in African American and White Adults

the HANDLS SCAN Study

Shari R. Waldstein, Gregory A. Dore, Christos Davatzikos, Leslie I. Katzel, Rao Gullapalli, Stephen L. Seliger, Theresa Kouo, William F. Rosenberger, Guray Erus, Michele K. Evans, Alan B. Zonderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine interactive relations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed global brain outcomes with previously demonstrated prognostic significance for stroke, dementia, and mortality. METHODS: Participants were 147 African Americans (AAs) and whites (ages 33–71 years; 43% AA; 56% female; 26% below poverty) in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span SCAN substudy. Cranial MRI was conducted using a 3.0 T unit. White matter (WM) lesion volumes and total brain, gray matter, and WM volumes were computed. An SES composite was derived from education and poverty status. RESULTS: Significant interactions of race and SES were observed for WM lesion volume (b = 1.38; η = 0.036; p = .028), total brain (b = 86.72; η = 0.042; p < .001), gray matter (b = 40.16; η = 0.032; p = .003), and WM (b = 46.56; η = 0.050; p < .001). AA participants with low SES exhibited significantly greater WM lesion volumes than white participants with low SES. White participants with higher SES had greater brain volumes than all other groups (albeit within normal range). CONCLUSIONS: Low SES was associated with greater WM pathology—a marker for increased stroke risk—in AAs. Higher SES was associated with greater total brain volume—a putative global indicator of brain health and predictor of mortality—in whites. Findings may reflect environmental and interpersonal stressors encountered by AAs and those of lower SES and could relate to disproportionate rates of stroke, dementia, and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Social Class
African Americans
Brain
Stroke
Poverty
Dementia
Race Relations
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
White Matter
Socioeconomic Status
Lesion
Mortality
Reference Values
Education
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Differential Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Global Brain Volumes and White Matter Lesions in African American and White Adults : the HANDLS SCAN Study. / Waldstein, Shari R.; Dore, Gregory A.; Davatzikos, Christos; Katzel, Leslie I.; Gullapalli, Rao; Seliger, Stephen L.; Kouo, Theresa; Rosenberger, William F.; Erus, Guray; Evans, Michele K.; Zonderman, Alan B.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, 01.11.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waldstein, SR, Dore, GA, Davatzikos, C, Katzel, LI, Gullapalli, R, Seliger, SL, Kouo, T, Rosenberger, WF, Erus, G, Evans, MK & Zonderman, AB 2016, 'Differential Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Global Brain Volumes and White Matter Lesions in African American and White Adults: the HANDLS SCAN Study', Psychosomatic Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000408
Waldstein, Shari R. ; Dore, Gregory A. ; Davatzikos, Christos ; Katzel, Leslie I. ; Gullapalli, Rao ; Seliger, Stephen L. ; Kouo, Theresa ; Rosenberger, William F. ; Erus, Guray ; Evans, Michele K. ; Zonderman, Alan B. / Differential Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Global Brain Volumes and White Matter Lesions in African American and White Adults : the HANDLS SCAN Study. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2016.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine interactive relations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed global brain outcomes with previously demonstrated prognostic significance for stroke, dementia, and mortality. METHODS: Participants were 147 African Americans (AAs) and whites (ages 33–71 years; 43{\%} AA; 56{\%} female; 26{\%} below poverty) in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span SCAN substudy. Cranial MRI was conducted using a 3.0 T unit. White matter (WM) lesion volumes and total brain, gray matter, and WM volumes were computed. An SES composite was derived from education and poverty status. RESULTS: Significant interactions of race and SES were observed for WM lesion volume (b = 1.38; η = 0.036; p = .028), total brain (b = 86.72; η = 0.042; p < .001), gray matter (b = 40.16; η = 0.032; p = .003), and WM (b = 46.56; η = 0.050; p < .001). AA participants with low SES exhibited significantly greater WM lesion volumes than white participants with low SES. White participants with higher SES had greater brain volumes than all other groups (albeit within normal range). CONCLUSIONS: Low SES was associated with greater WM pathology—a marker for increased stroke risk—in AAs. Higher SES was associated with greater total brain volume—a putative global indicator of brain health and predictor of mortality—in whites. Findings may reflect environmental and interpersonal stressors encountered by AAs and those of lower SES and could relate to disproportionate rates of stroke, dementia, and mortality.",
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T1 - Differential Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Global Brain Volumes and White Matter Lesions in African American and White Adults

T2 - the HANDLS SCAN Study

AU - Waldstein, Shari R.

AU - Dore, Gregory A.

AU - Davatzikos, Christos

AU - Katzel, Leslie I.

AU - Gullapalli, Rao

AU - Seliger, Stephen L.

AU - Kouo, Theresa

AU - Rosenberger, William F.

AU - Erus, Guray

AU - Evans, Michele K.

AU - Zonderman, Alan B.

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine interactive relations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed global brain outcomes with previously demonstrated prognostic significance for stroke, dementia, and mortality. METHODS: Participants were 147 African Americans (AAs) and whites (ages 33–71 years; 43% AA; 56% female; 26% below poverty) in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span SCAN substudy. Cranial MRI was conducted using a 3.0 T unit. White matter (WM) lesion volumes and total brain, gray matter, and WM volumes were computed. An SES composite was derived from education and poverty status. RESULTS: Significant interactions of race and SES were observed for WM lesion volume (b = 1.38; η = 0.036; p = .028), total brain (b = 86.72; η = 0.042; p < .001), gray matter (b = 40.16; η = 0.032; p = .003), and WM (b = 46.56; η = 0.050; p < .001). AA participants with low SES exhibited significantly greater WM lesion volumes than white participants with low SES. White participants with higher SES had greater brain volumes than all other groups (albeit within normal range). CONCLUSIONS: Low SES was associated with greater WM pathology—a marker for increased stroke risk—in AAs. Higher SES was associated with greater total brain volume—a putative global indicator of brain health and predictor of mortality—in whites. Findings may reflect environmental and interpersonal stressors encountered by AAs and those of lower SES and could relate to disproportionate rates of stroke, dementia, and mortality.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine interactive relations of race and socioeconomic status (SES) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed global brain outcomes with previously demonstrated prognostic significance for stroke, dementia, and mortality. METHODS: Participants were 147 African Americans (AAs) and whites (ages 33–71 years; 43% AA; 56% female; 26% below poverty) in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span SCAN substudy. Cranial MRI was conducted using a 3.0 T unit. White matter (WM) lesion volumes and total brain, gray matter, and WM volumes were computed. An SES composite was derived from education and poverty status. RESULTS: Significant interactions of race and SES were observed for WM lesion volume (b = 1.38; η = 0.036; p = .028), total brain (b = 86.72; η = 0.042; p < .001), gray matter (b = 40.16; η = 0.032; p = .003), and WM (b = 46.56; η = 0.050; p < .001). AA participants with low SES exhibited significantly greater WM lesion volumes than white participants with low SES. White participants with higher SES had greater brain volumes than all other groups (albeit within normal range). CONCLUSIONS: Low SES was associated with greater WM pathology—a marker for increased stroke risk—in AAs. Higher SES was associated with greater total brain volume—a putative global indicator of brain health and predictor of mortality—in whites. Findings may reflect environmental and interpersonal stressors encountered by AAs and those of lower SES and could relate to disproportionate rates of stroke, dementia, and mortality.

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DO - 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000408

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JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

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