Different B cell populations mediate early and late memory during an endogenous immune response

Kathryn A. Pape, Justin J. Taylor, Robert W. Maul, Patricia J. Gearhart, Marc K. Jenkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Memory B cells formed in response to microbial antigens provide immunity to later infections; however, the inability to detect rare endogenous antigen-specific cells limits current understanding of this process. Using an antigen-based technique to enrich these cells, we found that immunization with a model protein generated B memory cells that expressed isotype-switched immunoglobulins (swIg) or retained IgM. The more numerous IgM+ cells were longer lived than the swIg+ cells. However, swIg+ memory cells dominated the secondary response because of the capacity to become activated in the presence of neutralizing serum immunoglobulin. Thus, we propose that memory relies on swIg+ cells until they disappear and serum immunoglobulin falls to a low level, in which case memory resides with durable IgM+ reserves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1203-1207
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume331
Issue number6021
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2011
Externally publishedYes

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B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulins
Population
Immunoglobulin M
Antigens
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Serum
Immunity
Immunization
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Pape, K. A., Taylor, J. J., Maul, R. W., Gearhart, P. J., & Jenkins, M. K. (2011). Different B cell populations mediate early and late memory during an endogenous immune response. Science, 331(6021), 1203-1207. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201730

Different B cell populations mediate early and late memory during an endogenous immune response. / Pape, Kathryn A.; Taylor, Justin J.; Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Jenkins, Marc K.

In: Science, Vol. 331, No. 6021, 04.03.2011, p. 1203-1207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pape, KA, Taylor, JJ, Maul, RW, Gearhart, PJ & Jenkins, MK 2011, 'Different B cell populations mediate early and late memory during an endogenous immune response', Science, vol. 331, no. 6021, pp. 1203-1207. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1201730
Pape, Kathryn A. ; Taylor, Justin J. ; Maul, Robert W. ; Gearhart, Patricia J. ; Jenkins, Marc K. / Different B cell populations mediate early and late memory during an endogenous immune response. In: Science. 2011 ; Vol. 331, No. 6021. pp. 1203-1207.
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