Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture

Alan M. Rathbun, Michelle Shardell, Denise Orwig, J. Richard Hebel, Gregory E. Hicks, Thomas Beck, Marc C. Hochberg, Jay Magaziner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Summary: Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Introduction: Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. Methods: The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Results: Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of −4.60 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] −7.76 %, −0.20 %) in men and an insignificant change of −1.62 % (95 % CI −4.57 %, 1.32 %) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. Conclusions: There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Aging
  • DXA
  • Hip fracture
  • Osteoporosis
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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