Differences in the predominance of lysosomal and autophagic pathologies between infants and adults with Pompe disease: Implications for therapy

Nina Raben, Evelyn Ralston, Yin Hsiu Chien, Rebecca Baum, Cynthia Schreiner, Wuh Liang Hwu, Kristien J M Zaal, Paul H. Plotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase, the enzyme that degrades glycogen in the lysosomes. The disease manifests as a fatal cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle myopathy in infants; in milder late-onset forms skeletal muscle is the major tissue affected. We have previously demonstrated that autophagic inclusions in muscle are prominent in adult patients and the mouse model. In this study we have evaluated the contribution of the autophagic pathology in infants before and 6. months after enzyme replacement therapy. Single muscle fibers, isolated from muscle biopsies, were stained for autophagosomal and lysosomal markers and analyzed by confocal microscopy. In addition, unstained bundles of fixed muscles were analyzed by second harmonic imaging. Unexpectedly, the autophagic component which is so prominent in juvenile and adult patients was negligible in infants; instead, the overwhelming characteristic was the presence of hugely expanded lysosomes. After 6. months on therapy, however, the autophagic buildup becomes visible as if unmasked by the clearance of glycogen. In most fibers, the two pathologies did not seem to coexist. These data point to the possibility of differences in the pathogenesis of Pompe disease in infants and adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-331
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Genetics and Metabolism
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glycogen Storage Disease Type II
Pathology
Muscle
Muscles
Lysosomes
Glycogen
Skeletal Muscle
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Muscular Diseases
Therapeutics
Cardiomyopathies
Confocal Microscopy
alpha-Glucosidases
Fibers
Biopsy
Confocal microscopy
Enzymes
Tissue
Imaging techniques
Acids

Keywords

  • Autophagy
  • Glycogen storage disease
  • Lysosomal storage
  • Myopathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Differences in the predominance of lysosomal and autophagic pathologies between infants and adults with Pompe disease : Implications for therapy. / Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn; Chien, Yin Hsiu; Baum, Rebecca; Schreiner, Cynthia; Hwu, Wuh Liang; Zaal, Kristien J M; Plotz, Paul H.

In: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, Vol. 101, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 324-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raben, Nina ; Ralston, Evelyn ; Chien, Yin Hsiu ; Baum, Rebecca ; Schreiner, Cynthia ; Hwu, Wuh Liang ; Zaal, Kristien J M ; Plotz, Paul H. / Differences in the predominance of lysosomal and autophagic pathologies between infants and adults with Pompe disease : Implications for therapy. In: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism. 2010 ; Vol. 101, No. 4. pp. 324-331.
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