Differences in osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells from murine, canine, and human sources in vitro and in vivo

Benjamin Levi, Emily R. Nelson, Kenneth Brown, Aaron James, Dan Xu, Robert Dunlevie, Joseph C. Wu, Min Lee, Benjamin Wu, George W. Commons, Dean Vistnes, Michael T. Longaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Given the diversity of species from which adipose-derived stromal cells are derived and studied, the authors set out to delineate the differences in the basic cell biology that may exist across species. Briefly, the authors found that significant differences exist with regard to proliferation and osteogenic potentials of adipose-derived stromal cells across species. Methods: Adipose-derived stromal cells were derived from human, mouse, and canine sources as previously described. Retinoic acid, insulin-like growth factor-1, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 were added to culture medium; proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were assessed by standardized assays. In vivo methods included seeding 150,000 adipose-derived stromal cells on a biomimetic scaffold and analyzing healing by micro-computed tomography and histology. Results: Adipose-derived stromal cells from all species had the capability to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells were the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells were the most osteogenic (p < 0.05). Human cells, however, had the most significant osteogenic response to osteogenic media. Retinoic acid stimulated osteogenesis in mouse and canine cells but not in human adipose-derived stromal cells. Insulin-like growth factor-1 enhanced osteogenesis across all species, most notably in human-and canine-derived cells. Conclusions: Adipose-derived stromal cells derived from human, mouse, and canine all have the capacity to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most osteogenic. Different cytokines and chemicals can be used to modulate this osteogenic response. These results are promising as attempts are made to optimize tissue-engineered bone using adipose-derived stromal cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-386
Number of pages14
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume128
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Stromal Cells
Canidae
Somatomedins
Tretinoin
Osteogenesis
In Vitro Techniques
Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2
Biomimetics
Cell Biology
Culture Media
Histology
Tomography
Cytokines
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Differences in osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells from murine, canine, and human sources in vitro and in vivo. / Levi, Benjamin; Nelson, Emily R.; Brown, Kenneth; James, Aaron; Xu, Dan; Dunlevie, Robert; Wu, Joseph C.; Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin; Commons, George W.; Vistnes, Dean; Longaker, Michael T.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 128, No. 2, 08.2011, p. 373-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levi, B, Nelson, ER, Brown, K, James, A, Xu, D, Dunlevie, R, Wu, JC, Lee, M, Wu, B, Commons, GW, Vistnes, D & Longaker, MT 2011, 'Differences in osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells from murine, canine, and human sources in vitro and in vivo', Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 128, no. 2, pp. 373-386. https://doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e31821e6e49
Levi, Benjamin ; Nelson, Emily R. ; Brown, Kenneth ; James, Aaron ; Xu, Dan ; Dunlevie, Robert ; Wu, Joseph C. ; Lee, Min ; Wu, Benjamin ; Commons, George W. ; Vistnes, Dean ; Longaker, Michael T. / Differences in osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells from murine, canine, and human sources in vitro and in vivo. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 128, No. 2. pp. 373-386.
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T1 - Differences in osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells from murine, canine, and human sources in vitro and in vivo

AU - Levi, Benjamin

AU - Nelson, Emily R.

AU - Brown, Kenneth

AU - James, Aaron

AU - Xu, Dan

AU - Dunlevie, Robert

AU - Wu, Joseph C.

AU - Lee, Min

AU - Wu, Benjamin

AU - Commons, George W.

AU - Vistnes, Dean

AU - Longaker, Michael T.

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N2 - Background: Given the diversity of species from which adipose-derived stromal cells are derived and studied, the authors set out to delineate the differences in the basic cell biology that may exist across species. Briefly, the authors found that significant differences exist with regard to proliferation and osteogenic potentials of adipose-derived stromal cells across species. Methods: Adipose-derived stromal cells were derived from human, mouse, and canine sources as previously described. Retinoic acid, insulin-like growth factor-1, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 were added to culture medium; proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were assessed by standardized assays. In vivo methods included seeding 150,000 adipose-derived stromal cells on a biomimetic scaffold and analyzing healing by micro-computed tomography and histology. Results: Adipose-derived stromal cells from all species had the capability to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells were the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells were the most osteogenic (p < 0.05). Human cells, however, had the most significant osteogenic response to osteogenic media. Retinoic acid stimulated osteogenesis in mouse and canine cells but not in human adipose-derived stromal cells. Insulin-like growth factor-1 enhanced osteogenesis across all species, most notably in human-and canine-derived cells. Conclusions: Adipose-derived stromal cells derived from human, mouse, and canine all have the capacity to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most osteogenic. Different cytokines and chemicals can be used to modulate this osteogenic response. These results are promising as attempts are made to optimize tissue-engineered bone using adipose-derived stromal cells.

AB - Background: Given the diversity of species from which adipose-derived stromal cells are derived and studied, the authors set out to delineate the differences in the basic cell biology that may exist across species. Briefly, the authors found that significant differences exist with regard to proliferation and osteogenic potentials of adipose-derived stromal cells across species. Methods: Adipose-derived stromal cells were derived from human, mouse, and canine sources as previously described. Retinoic acid, insulin-like growth factor-1, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 were added to culture medium; proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were assessed by standardized assays. In vivo methods included seeding 150,000 adipose-derived stromal cells on a biomimetic scaffold and analyzing healing by micro-computed tomography and histology. Results: Adipose-derived stromal cells from all species had the capability to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells were the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells were the most osteogenic (p < 0.05). Human cells, however, had the most significant osteogenic response to osteogenic media. Retinoic acid stimulated osteogenesis in mouse and canine cells but not in human adipose-derived stromal cells. Insulin-like growth factor-1 enhanced osteogenesis across all species, most notably in human-and canine-derived cells. Conclusions: Adipose-derived stromal cells derived from human, mouse, and canine all have the capacity to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Canine adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most proliferative, whereas human adipose-derived stromal cells appear to be the most osteogenic. Different cytokines and chemicals can be used to modulate this osteogenic response. These results are promising as attempts are made to optimize tissue-engineered bone using adipose-derived stromal cells.

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