Differences in Obesity Rates Among Minority and White Women: The Latent Role of Maternal Stress

Loral Patchen, George Rebok, Nan M Astone

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

White and minority women experience different rates of obesity in the United States. Yet our understanding of the dynamics that give rise to this gap remains limited. This article presents a conceptual framework that considers pathways leading to these different rates. It draws upon the life-course perspective, allostatic load, and the weathering hypothesis to identify pathways linking childbearing, stress, and obesity. This conceptual framework extends prior work by identifying age at first birth as an important parameter that influences these pathways. Empirical evidence to test these pathways is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-496
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Midwifery and Women's Health
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • health disparities
  • public health and nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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