Differences in Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Between Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Men in the United States

Terry L. Thompson, Chelsea R. Singleton, Sparkle E. Springfield, Roland J. Thorpe, Angela Odoms-Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Non-Hispanic black (NHB) men have higher rates of chronic disease than men in other racial/ethnic groups. Poor diet quality is one risk factor for chronic disease, but research on the diet quality and nutrient intake of NHB men is sparse. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the diet quality and nutrient intake of NHB and non-Hispanic white (NHW) men in the United States. Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data on 5050 men (31.3% NHB, 68.7% NHW) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2007-2012. To assess diet quality, we calculated Healthy Eating Index (HEI)–2010 scores from each participant’s 24-hour recall data. We used logistic regression models to determine if NHB men had lower odds of meeting dietary recommendations for nutrient intake than NHW men. We used linear regression models to identify significant differences in HEI-2010 scores between NHB and NHW men. Results: After adjusting for sociodemographic measures, NHB and NHW men had similar diet quality (P =.59). Compared with NHW men, NHB men had lower odds of meeting recommendations for dietary fiber and cholesterol intake and higher odds of meeting recommendations for saturated fat and sodium intake. Conclusion: Differences between NHB and NHW men in the intake of certain nutrients may be related to chronic disease disparities. Future research should consider racial/ethnic differences in dietary intake among men and the impact these differences have on men’s health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-342
Number of pages9
JournalPublic health reports
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • Healthy Eating Index
  • diet quality
  • men
  • non-Hispanic black
  • nutrient intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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