Dietary supplement therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

Alyssa Parian, Berkeley N. Limketkai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-188
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Pharmaceutical Design
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Dietary Supplements
Ulcerative Colitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Crohn Disease
Boswellia
Aloe
Prebiotics
Biological Therapy
Curcumin
Fish Oils
Probiotics
Therapeutics
Cannabis
Immunosuppressive Agents
Vitamin D
Chronic Disease
Infection
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Aloe vera
  • Boswellia
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Curcumin
  • Fish oil
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Probiotics
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Dietary supplement therapies for inflammatory bowel disease : Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. / Parian, Alyssa; Limketkai, Berkeley N.

In: Current Pharmaceutical Design, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2015, p. 180-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{626bd7e7813a480ea8a826045e6f2d6c,
title = "Dietary supplement therapies for inflammatory bowel disease: Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis",
abstract = "Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed.",
keywords = "Aloe vera, Boswellia, Crohn’s disease, Curcumin, Fish oil, Inflammatory bowel disease, Probiotics, Ulcerative colitis, Vitamin D",
author = "Alyssa Parian and Limketkai, {Berkeley N.}",
year = "2015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "180--188",
journal = "Current Pharmaceutical Design",
issn = "1381-6128",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary supplement therapies for inflammatory bowel disease

T2 - Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

AU - Parian, Alyssa

AU - Limketkai, Berkeley N.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed.

AB - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic relapsing and remitting chronic diseases for which there is no cure. The treatment of IBD frequently requires immunosuppressive and biologic therapies which carry an increased risk of infections and possible malignancy. There is a continued search for safer and more natural therapies in the treatment of IBD. This review aims to summarize the most current literature on the use of dietary supplements for the treatment of IBD. Specifically, the efficacy and adverse effects of vitamin D, fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, aloe vera and cannabis sativa are reviewed.

KW - Aloe vera

KW - Boswellia

KW - Crohn’s disease

KW - Curcumin

KW - Fish oil

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease

KW - Probiotics

KW - Ulcerative colitis

KW - Vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84960957341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84960957341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 180

EP - 188

JO - Current Pharmaceutical Design

JF - Current Pharmaceutical Design

SN - 1381-6128

IS - 2

ER -