Dietary restriction increases the number of newly generated neural cells, and BDNF expression, in the dentate gyrus of rats

J. Lee, Wenzhen Duan, J. M. Long, D. K. Ingram, M. P. Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The adult brain contains neural stem cells that are capable of proliferating, differentiating into neurons or glia, and then either surviving or dying. This process of neural-cell production (neurogenesis) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is responsive to brain injury, and both mental and physical activity. We now report that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus can also be modified by diet. Previous studies have shown that dietary restriction (DR) can suppress age-related deficits in learning and memory, and can increase resistance of neurons to degeneration in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that maintenance of adult rats on a DR regimen results in a significant increase in the numbers of newly produced neural cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, as determined by stereologic analysis of cells labeled with the DNA precursor analog bromodeoxyuridine. The increase in neurogenesis in rats maintained on DR appears to result from decreased death of newly produced cells, rather than from increased cell proliferation. We further show that the expression of brainderived neurotrophic factor, atrophic factor recently associated with neurogenesis, is increased in hippocampal cells of rats maintained on DR. Our data are the first evidence that diet can affect the process of neurogenesis, as well as the first evidence that diet can affect neurotrophic factor production. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms whereby diet impacts on brain plasticity, aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Molecular Neuroscience
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Neurogenesis
Dentate Gyrus
Nutrition
Rats
Brain
Nerve Growth Factors
Diet
Parahippocampal Gyrus
Neurons
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cell proliferation
Bromodeoxyuridine
Stem cells
Nerve Degeneration
Neural Stem Cells
Plasticity
Brain Diseases
Neuroglia
Aging of materials

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Bromodeoxyuridine
  • Caloric restriction
  • Hippocampus
  • Stem cells
  • Stereology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Genetics

Cite this

Dietary restriction increases the number of newly generated neural cells, and BDNF expression, in the dentate gyrus of rats. / Lee, J.; Duan, Wenzhen; Long, J. M.; Ingram, D. K.; Mattson, M. P.

In: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2000, p. 99-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{629d48d43fc648c8b3de7d669c15fe38,
title = "Dietary restriction increases the number of newly generated neural cells, and BDNF expression, in the dentate gyrus of rats",
abstract = "The adult brain contains neural stem cells that are capable of proliferating, differentiating into neurons or glia, and then either surviving or dying. This process of neural-cell production (neurogenesis) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is responsive to brain injury, and both mental and physical activity. We now report that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus can also be modified by diet. Previous studies have shown that dietary restriction (DR) can suppress age-related deficits in learning and memory, and can increase resistance of neurons to degeneration in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that maintenance of adult rats on a DR regimen results in a significant increase in the numbers of newly produced neural cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, as determined by stereologic analysis of cells labeled with the DNA precursor analog bromodeoxyuridine. The increase in neurogenesis in rats maintained on DR appears to result from decreased death of newly produced cells, rather than from increased cell proliferation. We further show that the expression of brainderived neurotrophic factor, atrophic factor recently associated with neurogenesis, is increased in hippocampal cells of rats maintained on DR. Our data are the first evidence that diet can affect the process of neurogenesis, as well as the first evidence that diet can affect neurotrophic factor production. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms whereby diet impacts on brain plasticity, aging and neurodegenerative disorders.",
keywords = "Aging, Alzheimer's disease, Bromodeoxyuridine, Caloric restriction, Hippocampus, Stem cells, Stereology",
author = "J. Lee and Wenzhen Duan and Long, {J. M.} and Ingram, {D. K.} and Mattson, {M. P.}",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1385/JMN:15:2:99",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "99--108",
journal = "Journal of Molecular Neuroscience",
issn = "0895-8696",
publisher = "Humana Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary restriction increases the number of newly generated neural cells, and BDNF expression, in the dentate gyrus of rats

AU - Lee, J.

AU - Duan, Wenzhen

AU - Long, J. M.

AU - Ingram, D. K.

AU - Mattson, M. P.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The adult brain contains neural stem cells that are capable of proliferating, differentiating into neurons or glia, and then either surviving or dying. This process of neural-cell production (neurogenesis) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is responsive to brain injury, and both mental and physical activity. We now report that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus can also be modified by diet. Previous studies have shown that dietary restriction (DR) can suppress age-related deficits in learning and memory, and can increase resistance of neurons to degeneration in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that maintenance of adult rats on a DR regimen results in a significant increase in the numbers of newly produced neural cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, as determined by stereologic analysis of cells labeled with the DNA precursor analog bromodeoxyuridine. The increase in neurogenesis in rats maintained on DR appears to result from decreased death of newly produced cells, rather than from increased cell proliferation. We further show that the expression of brainderived neurotrophic factor, atrophic factor recently associated with neurogenesis, is increased in hippocampal cells of rats maintained on DR. Our data are the first evidence that diet can affect the process of neurogenesis, as well as the first evidence that diet can affect neurotrophic factor production. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms whereby diet impacts on brain plasticity, aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

AB - The adult brain contains neural stem cells that are capable of proliferating, differentiating into neurons or glia, and then either surviving or dying. This process of neural-cell production (neurogenesis) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is responsive to brain injury, and both mental and physical activity. We now report that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus can also be modified by diet. Previous studies have shown that dietary restriction (DR) can suppress age-related deficits in learning and memory, and can increase resistance of neurons to degeneration in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that maintenance of adult rats on a DR regimen results in a significant increase in the numbers of newly produced neural cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, as determined by stereologic analysis of cells labeled with the DNA precursor analog bromodeoxyuridine. The increase in neurogenesis in rats maintained on DR appears to result from decreased death of newly produced cells, rather than from increased cell proliferation. We further show that the expression of brainderived neurotrophic factor, atrophic factor recently associated with neurogenesis, is increased in hippocampal cells of rats maintained on DR. Our data are the first evidence that diet can affect the process of neurogenesis, as well as the first evidence that diet can affect neurotrophic factor production. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms whereby diet impacts on brain plasticity, aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

KW - Aging

KW - Alzheimer's disease

KW - Bromodeoxyuridine

KW - Caloric restriction

KW - Hippocampus

KW - Stem cells

KW - Stereology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034489693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034489693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1385/JMN:15:2:99

DO - 10.1385/JMN:15:2:99

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 99

EP - 108

JO - Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

SN - 0895-8696

IS - 2

ER -