Dietary Patterns, Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

Jiankang Liu, DeMarc A. Hickson, Solomon K. Musani, Sameera A. Talegawkar, Teresa C. Carithers, Katherine L. Tucker, Caroline S. Fox, Herman A. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary behavior is an important lifestyle factor to impact an individual's risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the influence of specific dietary factors on CVD risk for African Americans remains unclear. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1,775 participants from Jackson Heart Study (JHS) exam 2 (between 2006 and 2009) who were free of hypertension, diabetes, and CVD at the baseline (between 2001 and 2004). Dietary intakes were documented using a validated food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and dietary patterns were generated by factor analysis. Three major dietary patterns were identified: a "southern", a "fast food", and a "prudent" pattern. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking and alcohol status, education level, and physical activity, high "southern" pattern score was associated with an increased odds ratio (OR) for high abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) (OR: 1.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-3.0, P = 0.02), hypertension (OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9, P = 0.02), diabetes (OR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.1-3.9, P = 0.03), and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.3-3.6, P = 0.004). Similar associations were also observed in the "fast food" pattern (P ranges 0.03-0.0001). The "prudent" pattern was significantly associated, in a protective direction, with hypertension (OR: 0.69, 95% CI 0.5-0.9, P = 0.02). In conclusion, dietary patterns, especially the "southern" pattern, identified from a regional specific FFQ in this Deep South African Americans, are correlated with abdominal VAT and cardiometabolic risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalObesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 12 2012

Fingerprint

Abdominal Fat
Intra-Abdominal Fat
African Americans
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Fast Foods
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypertension
Food
Statistical Factor Analysis
Life Style
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Liu, J., Hickson, D. A., Musani, S. K., Talegawkar, S. A., Carithers, T. C., Tucker, K. L., ... Taylor, H. A. (Accepted/In press). Dietary Patterns, Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study. Obesity. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2012.145

Dietary Patterns, Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in African Americans : The Jackson Heart Study. / Liu, Jiankang; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Musani, Solomon K.; Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Carithers, Teresa C.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Fox, Caroline S.; Taylor, Herman A.

In: Obesity, 12.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Jiankang ; Hickson, DeMarc A. ; Musani, Solomon K. ; Talegawkar, Sameera A. ; Carithers, Teresa C. ; Tucker, Katherine L. ; Fox, Caroline S. ; Taylor, Herman A. / Dietary Patterns, Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in African Americans : The Jackson Heart Study. In: Obesity. 2012.
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