Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension: Rationale, design, and methods

Thomas M. Vogt, Lawrence Appel, Eva Obarzanek, Thomas J. Moore, William M. Vollmer, Laura P. Svetkey, Frank M. Sacks, George A. Bray, Jeffrey A. Cutler, Marlene M. Windhauser, Pao Hwa Lin, Njeri M. Karanja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies across societies have shown consistent differences in blood pressure that appear to be related to diet. Vegetarian diets are consistently associated with reduced blood pressure in observational and interventional studies, but clinical trials of individual nutrient supplements have had an inconsistent pattern of results. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) was a multicenter, randomized feeding study, designed to compare the impact on blood pressure of 3 dietary patterns. DASH was designed as a test of eating patterns rather than of individual nutrients in an effort to identify practical, palatable dietary approaches that might have a meaningful impact on reducing morbidity and mortality related to blood pressure in the general population. The objectives of this article are to present the scientific rationale for this trial, review the methods used, and discuss important design considerations and implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume99
Issue number8 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999

Fingerprint

hypertension
blood pressure
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
eating habits
Vegetarian Diet
Food
vegetarian diet
methodology
epidemiological studies
Observational Studies
morbidity
dietary supplements
Epidemiologic Studies
clinical trials
Eating
Clinical Trials
Diet
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vogt, T. M., Appel, L., Obarzanek, E., Moore, T. J., Vollmer, W. M., Svetkey, L. P., ... Karanja, N. M. (1999). Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension: Rationale, design, and methods. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 99(8 SUPPL.). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8223(99)00411-3

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension : Rationale, design, and methods. / Vogt, Thomas M.; Appel, Lawrence; Obarzanek, Eva; Moore, Thomas J.; Vollmer, William M.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Sacks, Frank M.; Bray, George A.; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Windhauser, Marlene M.; Lin, Pao Hwa; Karanja, Njeri M.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 99, No. 8 SUPPL., 08.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogt, TM, Appel, L, Obarzanek, E, Moore, TJ, Vollmer, WM, Svetkey, LP, Sacks, FM, Bray, GA, Cutler, JA, Windhauser, MM, Lin, PH & Karanja, NM 1999, 'Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension: Rationale, design, and methods', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 99, no. 8 SUPPL.. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8223(99)00411-3
Vogt, Thomas M. ; Appel, Lawrence ; Obarzanek, Eva ; Moore, Thomas J. ; Vollmer, William M. ; Svetkey, Laura P. ; Sacks, Frank M. ; Bray, George A. ; Cutler, Jeffrey A. ; Windhauser, Marlene M. ; Lin, Pao Hwa ; Karanja, Njeri M. / Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension : Rationale, design, and methods. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1999 ; Vol. 99, No. 8 SUPPL.
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