Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma

W. Scott Stryker, Meir J. Stampfer, Evan A. Stein, Lawrence Kaplan, Thomas Louis, Arthur Sober, Walter C. Willett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary intake and the plasma levels of retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lycopene, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene for 204 cases with malignant melanoma were compared with those of 248 controls. Cases and controls were patients 18 years of age or older making their first visit to a dermatology subspecialty clinic for pigmented lesions from July 1, 1982 to September 1, 1985. Intakes of nutrients were estimated using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. No significant associations with malignant melanoma were observed for higher plasma levels of lycopene, retinal, or alpha-carotene in logistic regression analyses after controlling for age, sex, plasma lipids, and known constitutional risk factors (hair color and ability to tan). In similar models, the odds ratio comparing the highest with the lowest quintile was 0.9 (95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.5-1.5) for plasma beta-carotene, 0.7 (95% Cl 0.5-1.3) for plasma alpha-tocopherol, 0.7 (95% Cl 0.4-1.2) for carotene intake, and 0.7 (95% Cl 0.4-1.3) for total vitamin E intake. A trend toward reduced risk of melanoma was observed for increasing Intake of iron (not including supplements); this was related to the more frequent consump tion of baked goods, such as cake, among controls. Alcohol consumption was positively associated with risk of melanoma (x for trend = 2.1, p = 0.03); the odds ratio for consumption of over 10 g/day compared with persons with no alcohol intake was 1.8 (95% Cl 1.0-3.3).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)597-611
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume131
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

beta Carotene
alpha-Tocopherol
Melanoma
Diet
Odds Ratio
Hair Color
Food
Aptitude
Carotenoids
Dermatology
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Alcohol Drinking
Iron
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Lipids
lycopene

Keywords

  • Alcohol drinking
  • Diet
  • Iron
  • Melanoma
  • Neoplasms
  • Nutrition
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Stryker, W. S., Stampfer, M. J., Stein, E. A., Kaplan, L., Louis, T., Sober, A., & Willett, W. C. (1990). Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma. American Journal of Epidemiology, 131(4), 597-611.

Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma. / Stryker, W. Scott; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stein, Evan A.; Kaplan, Lawrence; Louis, Thomas; Sober, Arthur; Willett, Walter C.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 131, No. 4, 04.1990, p. 597-611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stryker, WS, Stampfer, MJ, Stein, EA, Kaplan, L, Louis, T, Sober, A & Willett, WC 1990, 'Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 131, no. 4, pp. 597-611.
Stryker WS, Stampfer MJ, Stein EA, Kaplan L, Louis T, Sober A et al. Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1990 Apr;131(4):597-611.
Stryker, W. Scott ; Stampfer, Meir J. ; Stein, Evan A. ; Kaplan, Lawrence ; Louis, Thomas ; Sober, Arthur ; Willett, Walter C. / Diet, plasma levels of beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol, and risk of malignant melanoma. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1990 ; Vol. 131, No. 4. pp. 597-611.
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